How To Build Hot Rod Chassis: By: Tex Smith

How To Build Hot Rod Chassis: By: Tex Smith
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Book Reviewed By George Phillips

This is a hands-on how-to guide to building a hot rod chassis. It includes basic chassis design information, plus sections on modification, scratch-building, steering, straight axle and independent front ends, springs, rear suspension, rear ends, brakes, wheels and tires. A large number of examples show application of this knowledge. More than a collection of articles on someones kit, a real guide to building it yourself.

This BOOK SHOULD BE REQUIRED READING FOR ANYONE WHO IS OR WANTS TO BUILD A HOT ROD . Whether THE CAR WILL BE NEW OR OLD. THIS BOOK TELLS ALL THE INFO ON EVERY CHASSIS DETAIL FROM START TO END, FROM THE MATERIAL TO BUY AND THICKNESS ,TO THE KIND OF WELDER TO MAKE IT ALL COME TOGETHER.

This BOOK  IS LOADED WITH CHARTS AND INFO ON EVERYTHING FROM SPRING TYPES AND STYLES TO GEAR RATIOS AND REAR TIRE SIZES AND STYLES, FOR MAKING THE CAR OF YOUR DREAMS. From HighWAY FAT FENDER CRUISERS TO LOW DOWN RODS, THIS BOOK IS FILLED WiTH PICTURES AND DIAGRAMS OF THE MANY CHOICES THAT MAKE HOTRODDING WHAT IT IS FOR SO MANY. The CHANCE TO HAVE IT THE WAY YOU WANTED AND DREAMED IT COULD BE.

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Picture 40004b  

This Cornhusker 1932 frame uses a minimal tubular center crossmember arrangement for a Flathead V8; after market suppliers often have several different crossmember packages available.

 

Picture 40005a  

Jim Clark takes out the 32’ crossmember in preparation of installing a special bolting X-Member. Such crossmember kits have been available through the years , or the builder can buy channel and make his own.

 

Picture 40002a  

With the frame upside down, Dale of Weedetr, added supports to the center crossmember to increase torsional rigidity. They also serve to mount the rear radius rods.

 

Picture 40003a   When Dennis Overholser of Painless Performance Products acquired this 1938 Chevy it had transplanted independent front suspension system and a rack -and-pinion steering that were not compatible causing a serious bump steer condition. To solve the problem a complete new front end assembly from Fat Man Fabrications was selected to replace the original setup.