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SOCIETY OF LAND SPEED RACING HISTORIANS
NEWSLETTER 159 - April 15, 2010
Editor: Richard Parks RnParks1@juno.com
President's Corner: By Jim Miller (1-818-846-5139)
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Some Names To Look For In This Newsletter:
 President's Corner, Editorials, I have just been notified that my good friend and superb racing photographer Ken Coles has died, Just a reminder that the funeral services for Mary Mant Parks will be held on April 17 2010, Editor's notes: Additional emails and letters of condolences on the death of Mary Mant Parks, I just returned from the USFRA meeting tonight where they had a guest speaker, Thank you for your mentions of the Throttle book on your column, Thanks for your help in getting this article in www.HotRodHotLine, To Jack Osborne: During my search for information on the Schiefer roadster I've found a few color pictures of the car with the '25 T roadster body as well as of the '27 roadster body, I would like to get in touch with Dave Cox who has the Woomera 1 wheel driven land speed record car, I went to the USFRA meeting this week where 'Butch' Graham told a few tales about his dads City of Salt Lake streamliner, While reading back issues of the newsletter I noticed numerous references to a 'Jack Stewart Memorial Trophy' given annually by the Rod Riders, A really neat 14 minute video of the '65 story of the 409 MPH Goldenrod, I followed the link and read your latest newsletter, Tom Fritz one of the paramount land speed and hot rodding artists today, Some of you might remember that Hope my #3 granddaughter got engaged at IMS (Indianapolis Motor Speedway) last May and was married in October, I just returned from the USFRA meeting and wanted to let everyone know they are looking forward to all of the air cooled VW's coming out this September for the World of Speed both the 36ers and the big block 130 MPH Club VW's, Ascot Park Facebook Fan Page, Thank you for offering to put it in your newsletter, I found this article in the Cleveland Plain Dealer dated September 22 2009, Gone Racin'…Throttle magazine by Jack Peters Xeroxed and reproduced by Don Tuttle, Gone Racin'… Vollstedt; from Track Roadsters to Indy Cars the Rolla Vollstedt Story by Rolla Vollstedt with Ralph Zbarsk, Thank you so much for forwarding me this information and the photo, Hot Rod 32 Ford Flathead SCTA ARDUN Racing Engine V8-60

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President's Corner:  
Digging through all your old junk is a lot of fun. When you've been collecting for ages you tend to forget what you have squirrel away so looking over stuff you haven't seen or read for ages is fun. Case in point is my find for the week that consists of the December 1957 issue of Sports Cars Illustrated. For those of you not old enough to remember this magazine would eventually change its name to Car & Driver and is still with us. What's even scarier is I can remember when this issue was new and how simple the world was back then. Being twelve at the time the mode of transport was a Schwinn bike with bobbed rear fender that had a crude flame job on it. Let me digress for a minute and say you could also take off and ride miles from home just to look at some "wild" new car you just heard about. Among the many discoveries that also came your way in those travels were the junk and salvage yards that dotted the landscape. One adventure reminds me of when I first inspected Jack Costella's little orange Nebulis liner back in '96. At the time he had these little prisms from a military tank hooked up on the car's canopy to raise his line of sight because he was flat on his back. Well back in the bike days there was this salvage yard on Jefferson Boulevard up by the Cemetery that just happened to have some prisms exactly like in Jack's car and guess what? I got two of them for the crude little coaster I built so I could lay down in it. They didn't work then and they didn't work to good for Jack.
   With that let's look at the first image for today, the cover of the old magazine. It was photographed at a place called Paramount Ranch.
What's interesting about the shot is it shows two drivers that also played in our sandbox at Bonneville. Ken Miles is in front in the Porsche and did the testing of the MG streamliner before Stirling Moss got in it for some records. Behind in the yellow Mercedes that ended up with a Chevy in it is Chuck Porter. Yep the body shop man behind the Post streamliner to name a few. The next five pages is a good story on Bonneville that covers the event from a different perspective that is of the sports car guy. Naturally the lead off pix of the story shows our old pal Bob Higbee doing his thing with driver John Christy. To rub a little salt in today's competitor's car owner Bill Scace drove the Porsche all the way from Chicago before it went out and set a new record. On the top right of the second page it shows Frank Arciero's little old Ferrari that set a new record at 176.913 mph. Our buddies Kay Kimes, Jerry Eisert and Bob Opperman had a hand in the cars running. Later it became even more famous with B-ville alumni from 1950 Dan Gurney behind the wheel of it at Riverside.
   The next page shows Big Ak with yet another one of his hot rods that he took to Italy to run in the famed Mille Miglia. He ran 177.42 mph for a second in class. Below it is even a stranger combo of the sporty car and the Competition Coupe. Our friends Dot and Bill Milliken took a Jag 6-banger and removed one piston to make it a five-holer then went out and set a record at 125.596 mph after qualifying at 127+ mph. The next page gets even stranger with a shot showing salt stalwart Mark Dees' little Merc sedan that went all of 103.92 mph and finished second in the A Sports Car Class. You could say nothing is sacred to a hot rodder when it comes to racing. Our bud Julian Doty told me an interesting story about when he was working on an MGA for the salt with a Ferrari engine in it. The main bearings had gone south so he went down to the dealer to ask about getting a new set. They were about $76 bucks for each half shell and naturally he said no way. A little research revealed a Volvo set would work with a little crank grinding so needless to say the job was completed for about 1/4 the price. Oh yea, it would of taken about six months to get a stock bearing set out of Italy
                              CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGES

Sports Cars Illustrated cover

Bonneville Nationals, "Their fastest year" article, page 1

Bonneville Nationals, "Their fastest year" article, page 2

Bonneville Nationals, "Their fastest year" article, page 3

Bonneville Nationals, "Their fastest year" article, page 4

Bonneville Nationals, "Their fastest year" article, page 5

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Editorial:   
 This week like all weeks bring some exciting news and breakthroughs. I've been spending a bit of time on my mother's passing, partly because I know something about her life and how it impacted dry lakes and drag racing. Also, every person involved is important. Jim Miller and I have been preaching to all of you that there are no small people in this sport. Every history and every life, whether they be a spectator, crew person, driver, owner, mechanic, writer, photographer or other involved person has a story to tell. I recently spoke to Burke LeSage and he is a treasure to our sport. Not only because he set records and dedicated a large part of his life to land speed racing, but because he knows so much and we need to know what he knows. I challenged him to sit down at the keyboard and write his biography and caption his photographs and tell us all that he can. Like most land speed guys, he agreed to do what he could. Burke also added that he missed a lot of what went on at the lakes and Bonneville because he was focused on driving the car. If a Hall of Famer like LeSage says that then we know that our job is going to be tough, unless we reach out and find spectators, fans, mechanics, wives, children and other interested parties and find out what they know. I am astounded at the numbers of people who went to the lakes at least once in their lives. I'll be talking to someone who doesn't appear to be a racer and suddenly I'll ask a question that leads to another question and then, all of a sudden, out pops this wonderful history of land speed or early drag racing.
   That leads me to the next topic, the Santa Ana Drags and Main Street Malt Shop Reunion which was held on April 10, 2010 at a park in Santa Ana, near the city of Orange. I didn't see a lot of youngsters there, maybe two or three under 60 and that's a shame, because it means that you haven't been reading the Newsletter. I wrote about this event and told you all that if you miss this reunion you can't possibly call yourself historians. I have to admit that I missed a few of them as well, but this group is in their 80's and they don't have much time left to tell us all the stories. I met Mel Dodd, Otto Ryssman, Gene Ellis, Al Teague, Ed Iskenderian and many others at the reunion and the wealth of knowledge just poured forth so fast that I couldn't begin to copy but a fraction of it for a story which I need to do. I learned that Santa Ana and Orange County was a hot bed of early drag racing years before C. J. Hart, Frank Stillwell and Creighton Hunter opened the Santa Ana Airport dragstrip in July, 1950. We credit Goleta as the first organized drag race in the nation and a date in 1949. But in fact, there were men who I trust explicitly who told of organized events that were run perhaps a year or more before that. Where was Jim Miller and Michael Brennan to help me interview these early drag racers? I also learned that midget and roadster racer Gene Ellis raced at Santa Ana and also was the starter and flag man for many of the races. I saw a wealth of photographs, entrance tickets and memorabilia and now I have to revise what I said and thought about this early race. You see, what we think we know is often wrong. That goes for all of us; we believe we know what happened and then we find some new information and we have to revise what we said. No historian is perfect and the ones that tell you so are nave. 
   As to my mother, well I must tell you a bit more. She always felt, like so many other wives and girlfriends of racers, that she was left out and that her contributions were minimalized. So many other women and children felt the same way; overlooked and underappreciated. I've seen a lot of this in my life. The contributions necessary to run a car are great. So many people, including mechanics, sponsors, neighbors, family and friends help out. That is one reason why I always thought highly of Joaquin and the Bean Bandits. They prominently display on their cars all the names that they can think of who gave them help and assistance. I can only guess at the number of times my mother took a phone message, met racers at the door, cooked dinners for parties and business meetings for my father and his board in the post-war SCTA. She sacrificed a great deal and so did my brother and I so that my father could bring order and growth to land speed racing and early drag racing. I could say the same for a lot of women; Marilyn Miller, Ak Miller's wife and Dorothy Miller, Zeke Miller's wife, among many.  Probably for the last time, now that my mother is gone and her memories too, do I have the honor of telling you all that a great lady has passed on and with her an era is almost, but not quite, at an end.

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I have just been notified that my good friend and superb racing photographer, Ken Coles, has died. Particulars to follow. Betty Packard

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Just a reminder that the funeral services for Mary Mant Parks will be held on April 17, 2010 at 11 a.m., at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day-Saints, 2150 Bonita Canyon Drive, Newport Beach, California. The building is located between the 73 Freeway and MacArthur Boulevard. For more information contact David Parks at 714-309-2001 or Richard Parks at 714-963-3557.

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Editor's notes: Additional emails and letters of condolences on the death of Mary Mant Parks.
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Please accept our most heart felt condolences for your loss. Your obituary was wonderful to read, thank you for the insight into Mary's wonderful life. Peter & Yvonne Broadribb. "The Madbrits." "Moody's Garage" Gasser.
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Sorry to hear about the loss of your mom. Found your biog on her to be quite interesting. You mentioned that she was from South San Gabriel and I wondered just where the family spread was located. I used to live there on Delta Street very close to Don Bosco Tech and most of the streets in our area were named for the family's that subdivided. Ray Del Pino a former TWA Flight Engineer lived across the street on the corner of Delta and Del Pino! Sorry I didn't find the time to chat with you on Saturday at the Racer's Reunion. Hila Sweet did a very good job, again. Bob Falcon
Bob: We grew up on 2110 Pine Street, between Portrero and Graves, near San Gabriel Boulevard. I googled the map and the area has changed dramatically. I wouldn't recognize the area today. I had to leave the Car Racers Reunion to be with my mother, who died on the same day as the reunion.
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We are so sorry to hear of Your Families loss, With our deepest Sympathies. The Sylvias Dennis and Linda
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Hello Richard. Nice to hear from you. My condolences to you and David on the loss of your mother. What a long and interesting life she had and how fortunate to be surrounded by so many family members who were able to take care of her. I'm sure the last few years must have been very hard. Thank you for sharing this brief family history - I found it very interesting. Regards to the family. Shirley Bunce
Shirley: Thank you for the kind words. Perhaps you can tell us what you remember about her. She never wrote her biography and so I have to put together a life story from what I know and what other people know.
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We are so sorry to hear this. She was well loved by many and will be missed. Our thoughts and prayers are with you. Mary and Joe Mondello
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What a wonderful life. A very loving tribute to you mom. Thanks for sharing it. Dick Martin
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My Deepest sympathies on the loss of your mom. Jim Miller
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I am very sorry to hear of the passing of your mother. Mothers have that unique ability to do things in a very special caring way that no one else can do and regardless of "their ways" in their hearts was a caring loving consideration for your well being was always there. I wish you strength and faith, as it will be challenging times ahead without her physical presence. Regards and sincere condolences, Ernie and Elaine Nagamatsu
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I am so sorry to hear about your mom. She walks with the Lord! Joe & Donna Timney
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Wow. Oh, for everyone to live such a rich life; especially in Southern California in those golden days. I lived on the Camp Pendleton Marine Corps base as a child, and those secluded beaches were so enchanting and peaceful, one of the things I miss about So-Cal. Thank you for such a touching story about your mother. With Sympathy for your loss, but joy for such a full life, David Walker
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We want to extend our condolences and tell you how saddened we are at the passing of your Mother. We really wish we had had the opportunity to meet her. If you are anything like her, she must have been a really neat lady. Thank you for letting us know. You and your family are in our thoughts and prayers. Hope to see you soon. Your friends, Bud & Lynne Rasmus
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My heartfelt thoughts are for you at this time. Remember the good times and be strong. Celebrate 93 good years with Mom. Don Rudy
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Sincere condolences on the loss of your mother. Best regards, Doug Kruse
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Ah, another compatriot back with heavenly Father. I knew Mary way back in the fifties, and strangely, I sold my Veyo, Utah house to a couple who had been in her ward, and knew her very well. We all travel so briefly in a tiny, tiny world. Take care, Tex Smith
Tex: Thank you for the nice words. I know that my mother and father, and especially my step-mother, thought highly of you. My brother
and I have a lot of old records and your name comes up in them. We would love to have you write your biography and add some thoughts on Wally, Mary and Barbara. Hope all is well with you and your family.
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David, Richard had sent me an email about your mother passing away. I am so sorry, but please be at peace that she is out of all pain and in a beautiful place. I just read a book named 90 Minutes in Heaven written by Don Piper which is a story about him being crushed by a 18 wheeler 21 years ago and was pronounced dead by 4 EMTs. Then another minister came by the wreckage and prayed for him and he came back to life after the 90 minutes. The story tells what heaven is like, what it smells like etc. He told about the people that he saw while he was there. He could not understand why God did not let him stay but after reading the book you understand that God knew his work was not done. It is the best reading I have ever read. I am not afraid to die. So please know your mother is in a beautiful place. Your friend forever, Eileen Daniels
Eileen: We always considered you more of an older sister for all the nice things that you did for us at the races. If it is alright, I will post your email to the newsletters that I send out. I've lost track, but it has to be close to 4 or 5 thousand issues by now. Some of them are historical, genealogical, racing, opinions and news. My uncle Roy Eves had an experience like that. He fell off a motorcycle just outside of Las Vegas and his brain swelled up. The doctors told the family that he wouldn't make it, but he was a determined man. He told us about hovering over his body in the operating room, then floated around the inside and outside of the building.
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Google the following link; http://www.oilstick.com/rparks/obit/maryparks93.htm. I have posted the funeral on the net for you, added it to the obit page and the other also on the net. I'm glad that she had such a loving family. Evelyn Roth
Evelyn: Thank you, that was very nice of you to do that. Yes, she had the family that she always wanted.
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My condolence on your Mother's passing; may God comfort you and your family and friends. Tim Kushi
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We know that your mother is very special to you and the families. Mothers are so special in our lives and they remind us always to be tidy. Regards, Ernie & Elaine Nagamatsu
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I want to express and share an expression of sympathy. I lost my mom quite a few years ago and Kristie just lost her Mom two weeks ago. I knew your dad well and my heart goes out to you in the suffering your loss. God Bless you and your entire family. From our entire family, John Abbott Sr.
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Our condolences to you and your entire family. The Minick family
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My prayers and condolences. Ed Aigner
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Please accept my deepest condolences. Your mother lived a full and exciting life. Gil Bouffard
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I'm so sorry to hear of your mothers passing. I hope you're okay and holding up during this trying times. Respectfully, Suzy Beebe
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I'm so sorry to hear about the passing of your mother. She sounded like a lovely woman. Would you like me to send this out to all Gear Grinder members? I will keep you and your family in my thoughts and prayers during this time. Amanda Taylor, Gear Grinder Secretary
Amanda: That would be very thoughtful of you since some of the old time Gear Grinders may have known my mother.
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I am sorry for your loss. I am glad she had a long, full life. I will be in Brazil April 17, so I can't attend. Best regards, Ken Freund
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We have posted this on our website. We are very sorry for your loss. JoAnn Carlson - SCTA/BNI Office
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My sympathies. James Chini
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You have my condolences on your mother's passing. I didn't know her, but of course, I knew your father well. I lost my mother in August 2001, she was 96, but even at an advanced age we are never ready to give them up. Will keep you in my prayers. Tom Bryant
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Just a note to tell you how sorry we were to hear about your mother. Please know that our thoughts and prayers are with you and your family at this sad time. Your friends, Bud and Joan Meyer
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My prayers are with you and your family. John Ewald
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I extend my deepest sympathy to you and your family in the loss of your mother. My thoughts and prayers are with you all. Sincerely, Linda McCoy-Murray, President/Founder, Jim Murray Memorial Foundation
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My Dad and I send our deepest sympathy. May the memories of your Mother always be close to your heart. Susan Foshee and Pat Berardini
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A wonderful story you wrote about your mom. Cheers, Bob Nichols
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Condolences on the loss of your mother. Mable & Ron Henderson, Lady Dragon
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My sincere condolences over the loss of your mother. I now live in Arizona so I will not be able to attend, but know that she and your family are in my prayers. Sincerely, Dr. Jim Davis
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I'm very sorry to hear this news. You and David have some great genes in your bodies. My condolences to all of you. Edward R. Justice, Jr. President & CEO, Justice Brothers, Inc.
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Our deepest sympathy. Love & Prayers, Anthony & Jamie Cardoza, Hollywood Pit Stop
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I am so sorry. Did this happen while you were with us at Parnelli's? I am so very sorry. There is just nothing to say that makes it right, so I will bow out as gracefully as possible and say, know that you are in my thoughts and prayers. Vicki James
Vicki: I had to leave Hila Sweet's Car Racers Reunion early in order to be with my family as my mother passed away that same day.
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Sorry for your loss. If I could get there I would. Della Woods
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Please accept my deepest condolences for the death of your mother Mary. She was obviously a terrific person who lived a long and quite interesting life. It must have been neat to live through and so close to one of the great ages of U.S. automotive history. Please extend my best wishes to the rest of your family. Sincerely, Dr. J. B. "Jack" Owens, Ph.D.
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Thanks for sending the notice. My condolences. Your mother and family will be in my prayers this weekend. All the best. Bill Johnson
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Donna and I send our sincere condolences on the passing of your mother. Jerry Hutchcroft/Roddin' & Racin' Productions
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Joann Brock and I received the news of your Mother's passing and extend our condolences to you both. Thank you for sending us this notice. Best Regards, Charles Rollins, Sara Rollins and Joann Brock
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Sorry for your loss Richard. I just lost my sister two weeks ago so we're in the same mood. I met your Mom one time at Pomona when she and your Dad were walking with Alex Xydias (my long-time, dear friend) and we stopped to say hello. Regards, Dan Fleisher
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Sorry for your loss, our prayers go out to your family. Ed and Mary Randall
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You have my deepest sympathy. Appears she had a great life and you were lucky to have her as your mother. Paula Murphy
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Please accept my condolences on your loss. Now they will both have to live in your memories. Take care, John Zimmermann
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So sorry about your mom. I met your dad a couple of times through the years, but never your mom, my loss. My family said a prayer for her today in church. My son is racing this week at the MNA World Mini Championships in Mesquite, Nevada. I will not be able to attend the services. Tim Meyer, Racing News West
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Many thanks for the heads up. Sadly, I am out of the area on contract work through months end and cannot attend. Please accept our condolence, and know that Mrs Parks and your family are in our thoughts and prayers. Take care, Mike Jones
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Sorry to hear of your loss, but it sounds like Mary led a full and fruitful life; we all should be so lucky. Best Regards, Bill Moore
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You have our condolences and our prayers. I knew your Dad but never met your Mom. Steve Chassey, VP Motorsports, Wells Fargo
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Sorry to hear your loss. May God be with your family. Albert Wong
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God Speed Mary. Check out the interview with Wally I don't know if you have seen this www.akaracing.com and click on movies Wally Parks also CJ. Jim and Linda MacMonagle
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What a wonderful life she lived. I know you miss her, thanks for sharing and God Bless. Kathy Weida, Las Vegas, NV
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I am so sorry. My thoughts are with your family. I had no idea you came from such a family. Cindy A. Meitle
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In lieu of flowers, my family will make a donation to Parkinson's research in Mary's name. Do you know if there is any particular way to do that other than going to their site on the Internet? Thanx! Linda
Linda: That is very kind of you. The family decided that we would make no requests. But if anyone has a favorite charity that they support and wish to make a donation in our mother's name, then we would be honored. The Parkinson Foundation can be reached at 800-327-4545 or at Parkinson.org on the internet, where a donation can be done on-line. But the family is not asking for donations; that is entirely up to those who want to do so.
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We all knew and loved Wally and now his Mary is also gone. Our deepest sympathy goes to their sons - especially Richard (who is part of this email book) and a dear friend. Betty Packard
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Just heard the news on your mother. These things are never easy. Our condolences to you. You are in our prayers. Wester Potter
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So sorry for the loss of your dearly beloved mother. My sympathies are with you and David at this difficult time. Aloha, Bruce Wheeler
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My thoughts and prayers are with you in your time of sorrow. May you find peace in knowing you have many friends that are thinking about you. Nancy Wilson
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To All - Hearts thoughts and prayers are with you. To had lived such a great long life is a true blessing and a remarkable journey. Our Deepest Sympathy, Gail & Ron Tesinsky
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I never had the good fortune to meet Mary, although I have heard many endearing stories about her. I did meet Wally in 1965, upon my joining of the HRM staff. We became good friends, lunched often and he provided me many bits of advice and wisdom, particularly when I became HRM's Editor in 1967. Were I still living on the West Coast, I would certainly attend Mary's funeral. However, I'm confident her life will be celebrated by many who were fortunate enough to have known her. I extend my sympathy and respects to you both, Jim McFarland
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I'm sorry to hear this news. Please accept condolences from the team of the North American Eagle. Jon Higley
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I'm sorry to hear about your Mother. I think it was your dad that took my picture for the cover of the first, Hot Rod Magazine. Sincerely, Eddie Hulse
Eddie and Joan: Thank you for your kind comments. I didn't get back to you quickly as I should have because I rarely check my back-up email address at Rnparks2. I usually just use Rnparks1@juno.com. Would you and your brother Chuck start working on your biographies for us. My parents never wrote theirs. I would be glad to help you edit what you write and we can do it quickly. Biographies are so valuable to our children and to our racing community and friends. I read about your cover, the first one in Hot Rod magazine back on January 1948, in TheRodders Journal. I know of four photographers at the time; Pete Petersen, Wally Parks, Lee Blaisdell and Eric Rickman. Tell us more about that day on the lakes and your record setting run. And while you are at it, be sure to caption the back of your photographs, because an uncaptioned photo is nearly a worthless one to future generations. My newsletter is The Society of Land Speed Racing Historians at www.landspeedracing.com. Thank you for the kind thoughts about my mother.
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I am sorry to hear about Mary. I hope that your family is ok in knowing that she is in a better place. With sincere love, Doug Herbert
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We are so sorry for your loss. Christine Thieroff from Kenny Bernstein Racing
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So very sorry for your loss, our deepest sympathy to the family from Johnny and I. Brenda Anderson
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Please accept my condolences on your loss, Regards, Tom Kelley
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So sorry to hear about your mom. But 93, she did great. Tony Thacker
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Please accept my condolences upon hearing about your mother's passing. I am very sorry to learn of this news and will pass it along to my dad. He was a friend to both your dad and your uncle Kenny back in his days of growing up in South Gate. I'll have to be more persistent in asking more about your family and what he remembers about going over to the house back then. Our parents are true treasures and I appreciate you sharing the story of your mother's strength in the latest issue of your newsletter. Your love and affection for her shines through your words of acknowledgement and praise. My prayers are with you and your family. My deepest sympathy, Chris Eichert
Chris: I'm sorry to get back to you so late, but I rarely check my back-up email address at Rnparks2. My main email address is Rnparks1@juno.com. I hope that you get your parents to start on their biographies and caption their photographs. My parents never did that and I am poorer for it. They don't realize that every thing they say and do that they record for later generations will grow in value. When our
parents leave us no record then the future generations have no past. To be without a past is to be orphaned. Tell your father that I would be very thankful if he could write down and send to me whatever he remembers about the old neighborhood and my mother, father and step-mother and uncle Kenny Parks. That would help me fill in so many blanks. And tell him to start on captioning his photographs for a photo with no captions is nearly worthless. Thank you for your kind thoughts.
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Mary Mant Parks has an obituary listed in the Orange County Register. If you would like to leave a message there Google the following website link at http://www.legacy.com/gb2/default.aspx?bookid=2538467488012&sign=1&cid=sugg, or if that doesn't work try this link to their website; http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/orangecounty/obituary.aspx?n=mary-mant-parks&pid=141816076. The site stay up for one year.
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My heart is with you. Hug. Cindy A. Meitle
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My condolences on the loss of your mother, Mary. I have written an obituary from the information you sent as well as your and Epi's nice remembrance that you posted on another web site. Is it possible you could e-mail a photo of your mom to go with it? You can send it to me. Many thanks, Mark Vaughn, AutoWeek

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I just returned from the USFRA meeting tonight where they had a guest speaker. The son of Athol Graham, Daryl 'Butch' Graham, came to share some stories about his dad's ill-fated streamliner and we were also advised he is currently restoring the car for display. You may already be aware of this, but I thought if you were not, the information could be significant. Apparently there was a feature a couple of weeks ago, March 29, 2010 in the Salt Lake City Tribune. I have contact info if you need to get a hold of him for additional details. He does not have email. Burly Burlile
   Burly: I received the story from Ron Main. I appreciate what you are doing. Keep researching and turning up valuable information.

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Thank you for your mentions of the Throttle book on your column! We appreciate the support! I am writing to you after receiving your contact information from Don Coonan. It is my understanding that he has discussed possibly emailing a Throttle book promotion to your newsletter subscribers. I just wanted to confirm that I have your permission to do so. Simply confirm by replying to this email. Please let me know if you have any questions. Thank you, Chasity Smith, Ad Sales & Marketing, The Rodder's Journal, www.roddersjournal.com.
Chasity: I'm glad to help The Rodder's Journal. We don't really have subscribers. No one pays us for the newsletters that we send out weekly and which are then published on www.landspeedracing.com. But you can send me short notices and I will add them to the Society of Land Speed Racing Historians Newsletter at no charge. You can also contact Jack and Mary Ann Lawford at www.hotrodhotline.com to see if they will let you cross-link your site with theirs. The Lawfords own both sites and another one on bikes. I encourage all the readers of the SLSRH to buy the book Throttle if they are serious about racing in 1941. It is a fascinating one-year snapshot of racing prior to World War II.

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Thanks for your help in getting this article in www.HotRodHotLine. Google; http://www.hotrodhotline.com/feature/heroes/wingedexpress/. Bud & Lynne Rasmus
Readers: Google the link or put www.hotrodhotline.com on your list of favorites. There's a great photograph of Mousie Marcellus, Bud and Lynne Rasmus and the Winged Express.

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To Jack Osborne: During my search for information on the Schiefer roadster, I've found a few color pictures of the car with the '25 T roadster body as well as of the '27 roadster body. According to all that I've read and seen, the tonneau (tarp) over the '25 cab was white with a red stripe along the perimeter edge: The body color was a very dark blue. Do you remember if it was Navy blue, or do you think it was even darker than that? Seems to me Paul was going for a patriotic color scheme. A very cool touch to the '25 was the "EQUIPPED WITH CHAMPION SPARK PLUGS" decals on each sides of the cowl, forward of the Pitman arm.
   Photoscaling suggests the frame was tapered slightly, like the Model A frame, but fit inside the dimensions of the '25 body, which was channeled over it about four inches. The very front edge of the frame was a good bit narrower than for a stock model T -- matching the width of the '33-'34 Ford truck grille (nominally 5 inches narrower than stock) -- but it was also a bit longer. The radiator is the only thing about which I haven't gathered any information. It looks like a custom job, like for a track racer. The '27 body was painted red, but I can't tell just how red. Would you say it was bright red or a bit darker than that, like fire engine red or International Harvester red? As you have said, the 27 body had a pretty deep six-inch channel, which made it appear very, very low to the ground. Next week I'm going to Oklahoma to pick up two pairs of Catalina wing struts, and I'll start the build process for one or both of the cars pretty soon. Hopefully I'll score a 59A motor soon, though I'll be happy to settle for the eab and 8ba motors I have set aside. Thanks for any help you can provide. VR, David Walker

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I would like to get in touch with Dave Cox who has the Woomera 1 wheel driven land speed record car, can you help! Regards, Glen Davis Design, 23 Kilpa Road, Moorabbin Victoria, 3189, Australia. Phone +61-3-9553-3000, Fax +61-3-9553-0500. www.trakkacorp.com, and Glen.Davis@trakkacorp.com.
Glen: I will pass this around to some of the guys and see if they know where Dave Cox is and how to get in touch with him. I will also put it in the Society of Land Speed Racing Historians Newsletter and see if Dave responds directly by reading the notice.

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I went to the USFRA meeting this week where 'Butch' Graham told a few tales about his dads City of Salt Lake streamliner. Included were photos of the current restoration project and a story about his dad's racing effort in a recent edition of the Tribune (the same article you used for the recent news letter story!). Below are a couple of personal emails (it is O.K. to publish!) between Garr and Jon Ovard, brothers who as teenagers helped as go-fers for the later (post 62) streamliner racing effort. Their insights are very informative on minor details most of us might not recollect. Hopefully they will be of interest to your readers. Burly Burlile
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Garr; Thanks for sharing. Don't know if you remember, but August 1963, as I returned from my mission, you drove me and your cute new little maroon Chevy out to the Salt Flats and we spent at least a day out there as Harry was trying to get the car running. I remember one of the inspectors coming and looking at that truck drive line and saying, "You need to put a piece of angle iron brace over that and secure it with a heavy metal U bolt just in case that drive line breaks--it could cut your car in half." I think reluctantly Dave or someone bolted a heavy piece of angle iron to the frame and then the U bolt around the shaft. It seems Harry's first run was about 230-240 mph, but the second run was under that and when we arrived he was complaining that he would step on the throttle and nothing would happen. He later admitted that things were looking good on the 2nd run so he just put the pedal to the metal, something that one apparently shouldn't do when you have 4,000-5,000 hp sitting in front of a little 'ol dump truck drive shaft, cause he snapped that drive line like it was spaghetti. I recall Dave being really glad for that brace and bracket -- even a comment like -- Man; maybe we ought to put a couple of those in there.
I made one semi-fatal mistake out there at the end of the 1st run. Someone asked who wanted to sit in the race car and steer while they towed it back to the starting area. Fancying myself young and strong and that I would look cool steering the car, I volunteered; then comes the education. That service road was anything but smooth, and when you tow a race car down that road at 50-60 mph with 240 psi tires and solid axles bolted to the frame, you can be absolutely beat to pieces. I tried everything -- strapping myself in the seat with the heavy seat and shoulder harnesses, I even tried standing in the seat, but all that I could find was pain and kidneys and everything else that felt like it was coming loose. I did not volunteer following the second run. Well, that is about what I can remember, but I recall August '63 being the date that we were out there with Harry Mulbach for his runs. John Ovard
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Reg; The attached photos show the only old photo's we can find of the car, built by Athol Graham, "The City of Salt Lake." The black and white picture is the only one I know of showing Athol, just getting into the unpainted car. Athol was a very nice and extremely funny guy, a lot like Al's dad - Max. I still remember the brand new 1958 Impala that Athol pulled the 348ci motor out of and put it sideways in the trunk for Bonneville. Max pushed him over 100 mph and it was so high geared it wouldn't even start, it would just pop - pop - pop and then die; pretty expensive experiment.
The nice color picture of the car with STP stickers shows its best condition right after a 344 mph run. I think that was with the left hand P-38 engine, which originally rotated the wrong direction and Athol said was a bugger to convert to run the other way. The next photo is the remains of the wrecked car; I know Butch still has the car, minus the engine. Somewhere there still is a black and white nose camera film showing the wreck as it happened. Max used to have it. I think Zeldine or her son Butch may still have that film. I only saw the film once, just after the crash. It was pretty scary. In that color photo of the wrecked car, you can see Al Fairbanks' mother Lucille who is in a white blouse and red pants in the right top of the photo. Nice photo of a very nice lady.
The last photo is one I took, while I was standing on a 55 gallon oil drum, (incidentally, the Allison crank case held 30 gallons). It is showing probably the 3nd rebuild after Athol's death and about a year or two after the Corvette road racer - Harry Mulbach dumped it at close to 400 mph around mile marker 6 or 7. The next year I think Otto was driving (he kneeling in front of the car) and blew out a rear tire from absolutely obscene wheel spin, he blew the whole rear off the car when the tire let loose (200 psi of nitrogen) when it went and rolled the car again. Otto made one run painting a 12 mile black stripe down the salt. The next run he got nervous, gave it too much throttle and blew the tire about 40 yards off the start line. Otto died the next spring from leukemia. Too bad, he was a very nice kid. I think Kent Fairbanks and I may have been out to the salt on Kent's Triumph Bonneville that day. Either that or possibly it was when Brent Gundersen, Al and I went out in the old Plymouth I used to run. I can't remember.
Al Fairbanks is the one without his shirt, next to him, working on the engine was Dave Weston, Al's cousin. Dave still grins when he remembers those days. That may be Butch in the cowboy hat with his back to the camera, or possibly B.D. (Boyd Dowden, who took all the other photo's I didn't take.) Al got copies of the photos for me from B.D.'s widow at his funeral last year. She had them set up around the coffin. Cool. I hope you find these interesting. It was a fun car to work on, I didn't do much but I made aluminum covers to go over the headers so the engine didn't fill up with water when it rained. We mostly just helped push it on and off the trailer, around the place and handed Dave wrenches when he needed them. We were pretty dumb kids then. I still get chills down my spine when I remember that sucker leaping to life.
Garr Ovard
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Burly, Thanks for the note. I'm trying to get more information for you. Of course you can use anything I say, however, I'd like for you to have something from the Grahams and especially Dave Weston. Zeldine is only about 75 years old now and could add quite a bit. Her sister still has fond memories as well. Athol's nephew is in contact with Athol's son Butch and I'm trying to get some more info from them all. Dave Weston, the engine mechanic lives in Buffalo, N.Y. now, and I only speak with him on the phone occasionally. He comes out to see us from time to time, and he has a vast knowledge of the car. He's the only one alive that lived through most every aspect of the cars life. I'm trying to get Dave to put something in writing. I only came to think about the car when my wife found the photo I had been looking for these past 30 years or so. I've recently discovered that I never mentioned to any of my kids, brothers, sisters, friends about my days wrenching on a track car nor my Bonneville days nor my experiences at LeMans with Ferrari. I was too busy at the time, and again, I never seem to think of the past much. My photos are mostly slides in boxes that haven't been opened in about 50 years.
Speaking of that, a few years ago I found myself home-teaching Wild Bill Madsen, who drove one of the short track sprint cars that I used to work on. I hadn't seen him in years. Bill is a really neat guy. One of my most vivid memories was of the motor in his car failing the night before the Copper Cup Classic, which used to be at the fairgrounds in SLC, but is now apparently in Phoenix. It was about 2 am, I remember Bill woke up a guy who had a wrecking yard, and there were about 10 of us with flashlights jumping from roof to roof on the cars trying to find the right motor. Someone yelled: "Here's one!" and we all ran over and Bill examined it; a fairly nice looking 1957 Chevy. "This'll work" he hollered. I said: "Why not a new engine?" His answer gave me some of the best wisdom I've ever heard. All he said was: "New parts are untested; this one has already worked once." Just then some one backed up a pickup with a boom and winch and began attaching cables to the motor while a couple of us climbed underneath and began disconnecting the transmission, hoses and wires. We cut the motor mounts with a torch, usually not recommended.
In a few hours we had swapped his heads, cam, carburetion, ignition and headers and had it bolted up in his chassis. We drained the old oil and replaced it with some very sticky Cactus Juice oil. It fired to life and we put it on the trailer. That night, with the only, pretty much stock engine, with a lot of miles on it, Bill proceeded to put it to the best that Colorado, Idaho, Utah, Nevada and Arizona had to offer, when the smoke cleared Bill had finished second overall. Garr Ovard
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Hope this was a fun read! Burly Burlile

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Burly: Can you get more for us and photographs as well?

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While reading back issues of the newsletter I noticed numerous references to a 'Jack Stewart Memorial Trophy' given annually by the Rod Riders. I had never heard of this award and needless to say it brought back some very emotional memories. Jack, along with Jim Seabridge, Dave Ratliffe, Dick Zook (?), Joe (?) and one other took my friend Tom Medlock and I under their wing during our first visit to Bonneville in 1962, enlisted us as 'gofers' and literally became our Bonneville mentors. I went back with Jack and Jim again from 1963 to '65 and spent numerous weekends in the dirt of El Mirage. As you can guess, these experiences were extremely influential on the rest of my life.
My wife and I drove out to El Mirage the weekend Jack was killed, not knowing of the accident, and while touring the pits was advised he had been killed the night before. We drove home in shock. Anyway, I have a good photo of Jack taken I believe in 1963 (attached above) along with a few others and wondered if you would pass this one along to the Rod Riders club.

Jack Stewart scan0001_001

If they maintain any kind of a scrapbook in Jacks memory maybe this can be added. Thanx for your help with my request. Burly Burlile
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Burly: I'm passing this on to those that I think will send it to the Rod Riders car club. Thank you for adding to our knowledge of land speed racing in the 1960's, which is often an under-reported era. Any more information that you can add on Jack Stewart would be very much appreciated.

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A really neat 14 minute video of the '65 story of the 409 MPH Goldenrod. Google; http://www.jalopyjournal.com/?p=7069. Burly Burlile

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I followed the link and read your latest newsletter. I was concerned about this statement: "Impact Racing has submitted proof to the SCTA that their products met the SFI specifications for the year 2009 and 2010." Impact Racing has not submitted anything to SCTA. SCTA follows SFI certification requirements and are therefore bound by their guidelines and rulings. If we were to set our own standards then we would be liable if these products failed. Please read the following links and it may help clarify the situation for you: http://www.scta-bni.org/UPDATE%20OF%20CERTIFICATION%20STATUS%20ON%20IMPACT%20RACING%20EQUIPMENT.pdf
http://www.sfifoundation.com/PressRelease04-01-10.pdf. If you have any further questions, please contact myself, Lee Kennedy or Van Butler.
Kind regards, Miriam Macmillan, Secretary SCTA
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Miriam: Thank you for the link and for your concern. For our readers interest, this is what was in Issue #158. "Impact Racing has submitted proof to the SCTA that their products met the SFI specifications for the year 2009 and 2010, see http://www.sfifoundation.com. Products prior to 2009 have not yet been certified or recertified by SFI. The SCTA Technical Committee has agreed to accept the findings of SFI and Snell, safety certification organizations. If you own any products from Impact Racing prior to 2009 you will be required to replace them. Check with your club rep or the SCTA for further updates as the racing season is not far away. This message is from Lee Kennedy, Steve Davies and Van Butler and was sent in by Ron Main."
Now I was a little leery of putting this into the newsletter, even though I trusted Lee Kennedy, Steve Davies, Van Butler and Ron Main. So I googled SFI and this is what I found on their website.
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April, 2010. JOINT PRESS RELEASE. www.sfi.com. April 1, 2010 - Impact Racing, LLC and SFI Foundation, Inc., in the litigation pending in the United States District Court for the Southern District of Indiana, have agreed that:
1. Impact Racing, LLC has provided sworn testimony that, upon review and investigation, no counterfeit SFI Conformance Labels have been used on Impact Racing products during the production years of 2009 and 2010.
2. Impact Racing, LLC has provided sworn testimony that, upon review and investigation, all Impact Racing products manufactured and sold during the production years 2009 and 2010 meet SFI specifications.
3. Based upon this sworn testimony, the decertification against Impact Racing products for the production years 2009 and 2010 is lifted. The decertification of the production years prior to 2009 and 2010 remains in effect. The parties will continue to work cooperatively in an effort to resolve the issues relating to decertification in these years.
4. Impact Racing stands behind the safety of all products it has manufactured and to which SFI Conformance Labels have been affixed. SFI will continue to monitor compliance with product specifications.
5. Impact Racing, LLC and SFI Foundation, Inc. will cooperate in determining whether any Impact Racing product bears a counterfeit SFI Conformance Label and if any safety issue exists in regard to products manufactured prior to 2009 and 2010.
6. If any Impact Racing product does not bear the date of manufacture the purchaser or user is instructed to immediately contact Impact Racing who will provide verification of the date of manufacture. Impact Racing, LLC will immediately notify SFI Foundation, Inc. of this occurrence. Impact Racing, LLC and SFI Foundation, Inc. will work with the sanctioning bodies to determine the best method for product users to present verification of the date of manufacture.
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Once I had this confirmation on the official website I published the email that I received from Ron Main. The Society of Land Speed Racing Historians is interested in all aspects of land speed racing, although most of our time is involved with the past. However, if there is current news that is submitted to us by our members we do print that. We are all volunteers and there is no paid staff to do research. Jim Miller and I do make an attempt to identify and verify what we can, when we can, but this is not a professional organization or publication, though we number a few professional writers and photographers among our group. Therefore, when we err, we offer a public apology and retraction to all involved without being asked to. Those who have written or called Jim or I to notify us of an error have been treated with utmost respect and we work with the public to remove and to repair any damage we may have done. There is absolutely no intent to cause harm. In this case the original statement by Kennedy, Davies, Van Butler, Ron Main, the SFI and Impact Racing stands as stated in Issue #158, for I can find no proof that the submission by Ron Main was in error. It is vitally important that all safety equipment pass rigid standards and the SCTA is to be commended for making sure that safety is of paramount importance. Richard Parks, editor

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SFI released an initial statement stating that all Impact Racing equipment was decertified. SCTA issued a statement (I proof read it and put it on letterhead and distributed it to all Club Presidents and Board members) based on SFI's recommendation. Lee Kennedy and Van Butler were the point of contact on all of this. SFI released an update, which happened after legal discussion with Impact Racing (This is the link I sent you). SCTA then released an update to their original press release informing again all Club Presidents etc. that from items manufactured PRIOR to January 1, 2009 (not including helmets) were decertified. Items with a manufacture date of 2009 and 2010 were ok. I wrote this one and had it approved by Lee and Van and it was issued under their names (I'm just the secretary). What should have happened is that Dan Warner should have sent you a copy of both press releases, asking you to post them. If it is ok with you, I'll add you to my list for things like this. That way you'll get the info straight from me, without any modification or interpretation. You have a great web site. I have to explore some more. Let me know if I can be of any help in the future. Kind regards, Miriam Macmillan, Secretary SCTA
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   Miriam: Thank you for the updates, because this is a touchy legal matter that is best if understood by all of us, even though it may prove to be painful. Security and safety are issues that my father wrestled with back in the 1930's and that problem will always be with us. We have to look it squarely in the face and confront safety issues honestly and fairly. Inspectors and sanctioning bodies cannot look the other way when dangers appear, even when racers and businesses implore us to give them a break. We have all seen accidents, injuries and deaths happen and then ask ourselves, "Did we do enough?" The Society of Land Speed Racing Historians looks at, probes, dissects and studies the past and present issues regarding land speed racing. We want to understand what happened and what people were thinking and doing. The SCTA has a long history in regards to safety inspections. The Southern California Timing Association's security and inspection system is the model for the National Hot Rod Association's Safety Safari and security systems. It is in the interest of everyone involved to correct the problem. Thank you for your offer of sending us press releases. Our newsletter accepts all correspondences and publishes that which has merit and interest for land speed, early drag racing history and hot rodding.

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Tom Fritz, one of the paramount land speed and hot rodding artists today, has a great website with news of the racing and hot rodding scene. You can get on his newsletter list by contacting Tom at Tom Fritz Inc, Post Office Box 800, Newbury Park, California 91319, or email him at tom@fritzart.com. In his recent newsletter he shows his latest masterpiece, "These ain't silk P'J's," a motorcycle racer. Fritz was also commissioned to paint the posters for the upcoming hot rod movie, "The Deuce of Spades," by filmmaker Faith Granger. These lithograph posters are titled, "Johnny Callaway," the hero of the movie next to his roadster, and "Last Race" with a blood red sun behind the two rivals in one of the racing scenes in the movie. The posters are $35 each. Fritz recently exhibited at the Grand National Roadster Show. If you like art and hot rodding, then you'll love his work. Google www.fritzart.com.
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Where's that going to be installed? I DID send you my most complete bio stuff. A while back, you broadcasted an email that I swear was pointed at me. If I recall, I nailed myself down and completed it for you. Let me know, Tom

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Tom: It will be published at www.landspeedracing.com and since you are already on www.hotrodhotline.com, just ask Mary Ann to post it there as well. She owns both sites. Your bio hasn't been published yet. I had it in my "to work" file and my server changed programs and all of that material is now in limbo and I don't know how to recover it. But I did make a copy and here it is. You will notice a few questions. See if you can answer them and proof read the entire bio and when you are satisfied, resend it to me with about 6 digital photos in the 60 KB range back to Roger Rohrdanz. We should have it on-line in about 10 days and thanks for reminding me about this. After my mom's funeral I have to cross-check every article I've ever written and catch those bios that haven't been done yet. Yes, you were one of those individuals that I had in mind, but you have lots of company too, including Roger and I.

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Some of you might remember that Hope, my #3 granddaughter, got engaged at IMS (Indianapolis Motor Speedway) last May and was married in October. Her husband, Trey Jackson, is appearing tonite on "Dancing with the Stars" as part of his dance troupe, Vibe. DWTS has also auditioned my granddaughter but the celeb they were going to partner her with decided against dancing so no go for her. Let's hope this all leads to good things for them in the future.  Betty Packard
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   Betty: Congratulations; now I will look forward to watching DWTS. It's my wife's favorite show

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I just returned from the USFRA meeting and wanted to let everyone know they are looking forward to all of the air cooled VW's coming out this September for the World of Speed, both the 36ers and the big block 130 MPH Club VW's. While their I was able to get some specific information on the upcoming for '2011' helmet rule changes and wanted to pass this on to you. Snell 2000 helmets will still be good for this year but in 2011 you will have to change to Snell 2005SA helmets to be able to race. Do not purchase 2000M helmets as those are designed for motorcycles so be sure to look for Snell 2005SA. All helmets must be full face with pull down visors. Also, for those folks building SCTA/BNI sanctioned racers to run on the longer courses, in 2011 you will also need to add a HANS neck restraining device to be able to race. This "DOES NOT APPLY" to those racers running in 36hp Challenge cars or VW big block cars running on the shorter 130 MPH Club course!
I have also attached a tire information sheet for any racers who expect their Volkswagen to exceed 100 miles per hour. Below 100, S rated tires in very good condition will be allowed on VW's, but once your speed exceeds 100, you will need H rated tires. The above list is designed to help you source them if you do not have luck on your own. Also remember ALL wheel and tire combinations must have both metal valves stems and caps, regardless of weather you run on the long or shorts courses. This even applies to Stone Stock bugs, buses and Ghias so come prepared! May the Speed be with you. Burly Burlile
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Tires and the 36hp Challenge and 130 Club VW Racers common question answers. NOTE: ALWAYS refer to the sanctioning body (USFRA, ECTA, TEXAS MILE) rules and regulations for the most current and up to date guidelines. Information listed below is for general information only and may not represent the most up to date rule changes.
130 Mile Per Hour Club (USFRA) and similar ECTA and TEXAS MILE categories require H-Rated (to 130 mph) marked tires in very good condition to be fitted to all four wheels when running in land speed racing events. 36hp engine powered Volkswagens that have not achieved a speed of 100 miles per hour in previous time trials are allowed to run S-Rated (to 112 mph) tires up to the time they exceed 100 miles per hour, at which time it is necessary to switch to the higher H rated tires for all remaining passes.
For 2009, rule changes have mandated that all 130 Mile Per Hour Club racers including ALL 36hp Challenge racers install METAL VALVE STEMS in wheels equipped with tubeless tires or TUBES with METAL VALVE STEMS with NUTS inside tube type tires. Be sure to bring your car ALREADY equipped with these updates so you will be able to pass tech inspection. These types of components are NOT READILY AVAILABLE for purchase in the small towns where racing occurs so please come prepared. Where to find:
S-Rated 165/80 x 15" tires - Usually 165 x 15 S rated tires, the most common VW size tire can be ordered through your local tire dealers (R-Rated tires are NOT LEGAL in 36hp Racing. Do not order R-Rated tires). Allow a week or more for delivery of special order tires (and metal valve stemmed tubes if needed!). Your nearest EMPI accessory dealer can also order S rated tires in 135/145 and 165 x 15 sizes. Contact EMPI at www.empius.com for local dealer contact information. Many tire sources can also be found in HOT VW"s, Ultra VW, Volks World and VWMA magazines. S-Rated 165/80 x 15 tires can also be purchased from www.tirerack.com and www.cokertire.com via the internet if not available locally.
H-Rated 15" tires- If your VW is not a 36hp Challenger or you expect to be running your 36hp Challenge VW above 100 miles per hour, street legal Hoosier H-Rated tires are available in a selection of narrow sizes for 15" wheels. Hoosier's Pro Street Radial series tires are designed for rim widths of 5-6 inches and come in diameters from 22.5 to 25.9 inches. In addition, five different manufacturers of drag racing "Front Runner" tires legal for use on all four wheels in 130 MPH Club street car type events are available through a variety of other sources via the internet and mail-order. The two most common are www.jegs.com and www.summitracing.com. NOTE: Front Runner style tires should NEVER be driven on the street and are NOT LEGAL for street use.
Front Runner 15" tires- Front Runner tires for 15" wheels are available in a wide variety of overall tire diameters ranging from 22 to 27 inches. All Front Runner tires are designed for rim widths of 3.5-4 inches (most VW rims are 4 and 4.5 inches). When installed on the wider VW rims, the slight spreading effect will make the tire "slightly shorter" so measuring the circumference of the tire when determining your actual gear ratios will provide greater accuracy in determining theoretical top speed and shift points than using the published diameter alone. Front Runner tires also provide a narrower front profile along with less friction (i.e. traction) which will improve your top speed when compared to wider more common street tires. Again, these tires are not street legal and should "never" be used on public roads or highways.
Listed below are sites where you can view the tire information on available H-Rated and Racing tires: Hoosier Racing Tires www.hoosiertire.com: Both street legal 15" radials (H-Rated), Formula V and drag racing Front Runners available in a wide variety of heights and widths. Hoosier provides the best overall selection in sizing, application and fitment information!
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Goodyear Racing Tires- www.jegs.com/p/GoodYear: Front Runner tires for racing only.
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Mickey Thompson Racing Tires- www.uprproducts.com: Front Runner tires for racing only.
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M&H Racing Tires- www.mandhtires.com: Front Runner tires for racing only.
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Phoenix Racing Tires- www.jegs.com/p/Phoenix+Drag+Tires: Front Runner tires for racing only.
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Moroso Racing Tires- www.jegs.com/p/Moroso: Front Runner tires for racing only.
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Tire Diameter Formula: 165 / 80 x 15 tire. 165 (tire size) divided by 25.4 (formula) = 6.49 inches. 6.49 inches times 80 (sidewall profile) = 5.192. 5.192 times 2 (two sidewall heights on each tire) = 10.38 inches. 10.38 inches plus 15" (wheel rim diameter) = 25.38 inches (tire diameter). Moon Disc Hubcaps: Legal in all classes but must be securely fastened with 6 screws if mounted to wheel rim or 3 D'zus fasteners if mounted to tab welded to inner wheel lip. Caution: If moon disc style hubcap is mounted with screws, inner tubes (with metal valve stems) are highly recommended to prevent slow air loss where tire bead contacts mounting screws. Wheel rim size: Although 15 inch VW rims are most common, other wheel diameters (13", 14", 16") can be used in all classes except the 36hp Stone. Stock category. Aluminum rims are allowed (except Stone Stock). Optional rim diameters also allow additional H-Rated tires selections.
TIRE PRESSURES: Tire pressures on the salt should be set at 50 P.S.I. for racing ( front and back). Be sure to adjust your pressures up before coming to race if trailering or adjust PRIOR to tech inspection if driving your VW. This is a SAFETY item to insure tubeless tires do not separate from the wheel bead and also reduces the tires rolling resistance for higher speed. Burly Burlile

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Ascot Park Facebook Fan Page. Check it out. Upload your memories, chat with other racers and fans. Google the following link;
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Ascot-Park-Raceway/115521451794792?ref=ts. Jason Lane jasonlan81@gmail.com
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Jason: I'll run your link in the newsletter. Hila Sweet's Car Racers Reunion was last Saturday, April 3, 2010 at Parnelli Jones' place in Torrance, California. There were a lot of people there who made Ascot famous.

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Thank you for offering to put it in your newsletter. I was wondering if you know how much I should ask for them? I want to be fair so that both myself and the buyer are happy. Nancy Giampietro
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Nancy: There is no way to know the value of the object as the market fluctuates and right now collectibles are very depressed. They're worth what someone is willing to pay for them. The best advice that I can offer you is to make a few phone calls to people who share the same interest and ask them what they think and if they would be interested in buying your die cast cars. Before you finish the conversation, ask them if they know of anyone who might be interested in the cars. It shouldn't take more than 5 calls to determine what most people would pay for them. Another suggestion is to take them to car shows and let people look at them. Sometimes you will find a buyer that way, since they are portable. Don't be in a hurry to sell as you want to find out the market value first. Reunions and car races are another place to show off your cars, if they are portable enough. Some people list objects for sale on eBay or Craig's list, but often the prices are depressed on these sites. I did not have very good success there. You might ask the people who sold or gave you the objects what they would suggest.

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I found this article in the Cleveland Plain Dealer dated September 22, 2009. Maybe this is the master plan. Sell off all the "real" planes, trains, automobiles, dry rotted furniture, buggy rugs, tapestries and replace them with a few virtual reality computers and monitors to experience historical artifacts. What a great Idea! Mike Kacsala
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Western Reserve Historical Society to invest in pilot project for museum usage. By Julie Washington,
The Plain Dealer, September 22, 2009.
The Western Reserve Historical Society will spend a $49,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities on a pilot project that explores the use of cutting-edge interactive technology in museum exhibits. The pilot project, called the Artificially Intelligent Artifact Interpreter, will use avatars, computer monitors and touch screens to create a futuristic exhibit. Museum-goers will feel as if they are looking at a time capsule that has been unearthed in the future. An animated computer character will pop up on a monitor and ask the museum guest to select from a group of museum objects marked with computer-readable tags. The animated character will read the tag, explain the object and offer an interactive quiz. The artifact interpreter should be up and running in the historical society in 2011. Beachwood-based LogicJunction, a software company that specializes in interactive 3D technology, is working on the pilot project.
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Mike: This is a sad development, because it is much cheaper to have an interactive system than to have a traditional museum that is very expensive to operate and maintain. Museum's need temperature and humidity controls and a large staff to inventory, maintain and secure the collections. With an interactive museum, you can simply take a few discs home with you and store all the text, knowledge and photographs for back-up. In fact, you don't even need a building, just a computer terminal and the museum director can send the history of the museum's artifacts all over the world. The Wally Parks NHRA Motorsports Museum spends more money on air-conditioning than it does on rent. You don't need a large staff of employees to have an internet museum. I can't say that the Cleveland museum is going to sell off all its collections, but the pressure is on them to raise more money and that alone tells us that they may have little choice in the matter.

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Gone Racin'…Throttle magazine, by Jack Peters, Xeroxed and reproduced by Don Tuttle. Book review by Richard Parks, photographs by Roger Rohrdanz

Don Tuttle rescued all twelve issues of Throttle magazine and Xeroxed them to form a pamphlet-style book, which for all practical purposes is simply called Throttle. Like the previous efforts of Don Tuttle and Leslie Long to preserve our hot rodding and racing past, it is a very simple job. There isn't any text or explanation from Tuttle to explain what Throttle is about, or even an index. The readers are left completely on their own to make sense of it all. The copying leaves the photos grainy and sometimes difficult to see. In a sense this isn't a book at all but simply someone taking the time to copy issues of an old magazine and put an inexpensive binding around them. Why should we even care to do a book review on something that isn't a true book? Because this magazine is special, very, very special. It's possible to find original issues of Throttle magazine on eBay or at swap meets. Exactly what you will pay for them is unknown, because the collectible market varies considerably. Expect to pay a considerable amount more than the 10 cents that the first issues cost. Even the original magazines are simple affairs, without any pretense at being an equal to Life, the Saturday Evening Post, Time or any of the other magazines of the pre-WWII era.
We don't even know much about the Editor and Publisher, Jack Peters. Hot Rod and dry lakes Historian Jack Underwood thinks he might have been a member of the Throttler's Car club, and went into the military at the beginning of the war in 1942. Wally Parks, who would become editor of Hot Rod magazine, President of the SCTA (Southern California Timing Association) and President of the NHRA (National Hot Rod Association), said that he doesn't know what happened to Peters. There is mention of a Jack Peters belonging to the Road Rebels Car Club which was a member of the Western Timing Association, formed just months after the better known SCTA. He burst upon the scene with a quality racing magazine, and in his Editor's Column of November 1941, told the readership of Throttle magazine that the first 12 issues of 1941 had been wildly successful. Jack Peters' work and hand is everywhere. He writes, edits and puts together the magazine seemingly without help. He writes to local police chiefs, explaining the importance of having safe and sanctioned racecourses for young people to race on. He stresses automotive safety and rules. The first three issues, January-March are almost entirely dedicated to dry lakes racing and car club activities. Only with later issues does Peters receive substantial support and news from other kinds of auto racing. Peters went on to write that he looked forward to more growth in readership and ad revenue for 1942.
As the November/December joint issue hit the stands, the Japanese were bombing Pearl Harbor on the 7th of December 1941. The sneak attack propelled the nation into a world war with the Axis powers of Japan, Italy and Germany, and racing activity stopped almost immediately. The nation needed all the rubber, steel, aluminum, gasoline and oil that it could round up for the war effort, and began to ration those commodities. No new car production would come rolling off the assembly line until after the end of the war. Racing was an expense that the nation could ill afford. Race car drivers enlisted in the military and ended up flying fighter planes and bombers. Hot rodders became mechanics in the service to keep our tanks, ships, planes and jeeps maintained. Dreams of racing glory were finished for the duration of the war. The high hopes of Throttle magazine would fade away, saved from oblivion by a few readers and collectors like Don Tuttle. After the war two young Hollywood Public Relations men by the names of Petersen and Lindsay would remember the old Throttle magazine and come out with their own version which they called Hot Rod magazine. How much inspiration that Petersen and Lindsay took from Jack Peters and his Throttle magazine is unknown, but the look and format of the two magazines are very similar. If the war had not occurred, would Jack Peters be the man people remember and his magazine the success that Hot Rod magazine became under Petersen Publishing Company and Primedia?
The bound issues can be broken down into 12 chapters, each representing a monthly issue of Throttle magazine. The November and December issues are combined into one magazine, but a special issue came out in late May to commemorate the running of the Indianapolis 500-mile race, won by Mauri Rose and Floyd Davis. By the April issue, the Throttle magazine becomes more varied with oval track racing holding its own alongside that of the land speed racing car clubs. And always, Peters adds an adult and mature tone to his crusades calling for safety and organization in auto racing leagues. Peters seems driven to promulgate a code of ethics, and to have the community, police departments, street racers, racing promoters and administrators accept the vision that he laid out for them. The booklet is replete with old advertising, and these ads in themselves are informative of the times. It contains results, points leaders and valuable information on the racing scene. The booklet has been out of print for some time, but the original magazines are still found at swap meets and on eBay, and there is a possibility that another copy of the 12 magazines will soon be recreated in a similar pamphlet format. The booklet is a snapshot of mainly Pacific coast racing in the year 1941, a pivotal year soon to be shattered by war. Gone Racin' is at RNPARKS2@JUNO.COM

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Gone Racin'… Vollstedt; from Track Roadsters to Indy Cars, the Rolla Vollstedt Story, by Rolla Vollstedt with Ralph Zbarsky. Reviewed by Richard Parks, photographs by Roger Rohrdanz

Open wheel and track roadster racing fans will welcome a book by Rolla Vollstedt and Ralph Zbarsky titled Vollstedt; from Track Roadsters to Indy Cars, the Rolla Vollstedt Story. Self published by the authors, this book documents Vollstedt life as a racecar owner and businessman from the 1940's through the '80's, which many fans of auto racing will argue was the heyday of motorsports racing. Zbarsky encouraged Vollstedt to tell his story, and therefore the story of those he raced with and against for over four decades. Vollstedt has an easy and informative story telling style and the photos are first class. 1600 books were printed and there are still some copies available from the authors. The size of the book is 8 by 11 inches, in a hardcover format, published by Zed Engineering and the ISBN number is 0-9733661-0-9. The price is $34.95 and there is no dust jacket. The paper quality is excellent and the cover is coffee table quality. However, purchase a clear dust jacket to protect the book. There are 160 pages, an introduction, preface and a foreword by Chris Economaki. There are seven chapters, an appendix and an index. Most pictorial books leave out an index and I was pleased that the authors took the time to include one. The appendix includes information on the 14 racecars that Vollstedt built and raced in his time, which is important because so often one car morphs into another and readers get confused as to which car is which. There is an appendix on Indy Qualifiers, showing the extent of Vollstedt's influence. He also has a section dedicated to the Indianapolis track owners and the feud that broke apart the racing league into bitter factions. Vollstedt makes it very easy for the novice as well as the true open wheel fan to understand and grasp the history of the world's most famous race.
There are 139 black and white photos, 57 color photos and 19 miscellaneous posters and other informative displays. Many of the black and white photos are sepia toned and all of the photos are well done. Vollstedt allows plenty of space for text and plot development. His story flows naturally from chapter to chapter and the reader will have trouble putting the book down. Vollstedt tells how he began working in a speed shop in Portland, Oregon just prior to World War II. He would be drafted into the war and serve in Europe until he was wounded and sent home to recuperate. Like so many returning servicemen, who had stared death in the face, Vollstedt came home with a desire to do those things that he had dreamed of for so many years. He bought his first race car in 1947 for $500, and met Len Sutton, who would be his driver for many years. Together the team of Vollstedt and Sutton would have success on the track roadster circuit for many years. 1948 proved very successful financially for Vollstedt, who by this time was racing professionally with Sutton. His net income that year would have bought him two houses at that time. They raced throughout the Pacific Coast as far down as Gardena and Huntington Beach and north to Seattle. Track roadster racing is fast and furious but eventually the lure of the big sprint cars proved to be irresistible and in 1952 Vollstedt built his first sprint car. They won the North West Sprint Car Championship in 1953 through 1955. Sutton would leave for Indianapolis and race cars back East, while Vollstedt hired Ernie Koch to be his driver. Vollstedt and Koch would race in the East as well at the end of the '50's. They raced at Langhorne, DuQuoin, Indianapolis, Trenton, Springfield, Sacramento, Phoenix and other tracks.
Chapter three discusses Vollstedt's rear-engined Indy car, which he built in 1963. With Len Sutton back as a driver, the rear-engined car was in fourth place halfway through the 1964 Indy 500 when the fuel pump housing broke and slowed the car to a 16th finish. Nevertheless, rear-engined cars would take over at Indy and other open wheel racing events, and Rolla's car would help to make that revolution official. Other drivers who drove Vollstedt cars were Cale Yarborough, Billy Foster, George Follmer, Jimmy Clark, Larry Dickson, Tom Sneva, John Cannon, Gordon Johncock, Tom Bigelow, Denny Zimmerman, Emerson Fittipaldi and Bob Harkey. But it was Janet Guthrie who drove for Vollstedt from 1976 through 1978 that garnered the team the most notoriety. Dick Simon was the primary driver and helped Janet make her entry into the Indy 500. Simon was instrumental in many other ways and great at finding sponsors for the team. Janet was new to circle track racing and Simon's tutoring made all the difference. Trouble with the car kept Guthrie out of the 1976 Indy 500, but the next year she qualified right in the middle of the pack. A broken part caused Guthrie to drop out of the 1977 race, but she had impressed the other drivers. In 1978, Guthrie drove a George Bignotti car and placed ninth overall and gave Vollstedt 10 percent of her purse for all that he had done for her in getting into the Indy 500 program. Rolla would continue to race at Indy through 1984, and also compete in England during a USAC tour in 1978. Vollstedt would continue to race his Offy powered cars through 1981, and was the last team owner to do so. From 1982 other V-8 engines like the Cosworth dominated the field and the storied Offy engines ceased to race at the 500.
Although 1984 was to be Vollstedt's last year to field an entry at the Indianapolis 500, he never really retired. Active in the racing organizations, he watched as feuds tore apart his beloved sport. He and his family still work on engines and attend reunions. He never won Indy but he was always competitive and but for bad luck and equipment breakage, could have had a real chance to have won it all. Vollstedt; from Track Roadsters to Indy Cars, the Rolla Vollstedt Story, is more than just about Rolla Vollstedt. It is a fascinating look back in time to an era with mighty characters in oval track racing. Men and women like Rodger Ward, A.J. Watson, Parnelli Jones, Janet Guthrie and Len Sutton come to life in this well documented book. A book every oval track fan should have in their library. Gone Racin' is at RNPARKS2@JUNO.COM. The book can be ordered from the author, Rolla Vollstedt at 4525 SW Lee Street, Portland, Oregon 97221.

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2010 Banquet final 1

Caption:
2010 Banquet Final.1.pdf ... Thank you so much for forwarding me this information and the photo. It will be a great addition to our club history, which is something we are continually working at to fill in. I am currently the proud holder of the Jack Stewart Memorial Trophy, which is awarded for outstanding Rod Rider participation. I have enclosed a copy of our 2009 awards booklet, so you can see the other past holders of the trophy. I’ll pass this information on to our President and Historian as well. Kind regards, Miriam Macmillan, Secretary Rod Riders Racing Team

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