Header__ARTICLEShorter
line12
slsrh-logo1

SOCIETY OF LAND SPEED RACING HISTORIANS
NEWSLETTER 207 - June 10, 2011
Editor: Richard Parks [email protected]
President's Corner: By Jim Miller (1-818-846-5139)
Photographic Editor of the Society: Roger Rohrdanz, [email protected]
Northern California Reporter: Spencer Simon

Click On All Images / Link For more Info / Images

Some Names To Look For In This Newsletter:
 President's Corner, Editorials, Services for Bill Summers will be held on June 18 2011 at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints starting around Noon, I went to the memorial service for Mike Kitchen yesterday at the Corona Del Mar California Senior center, Drake-Landers Eve Louise  April 7 1911 - May 28 2011 Born Eva Louise Roark in Mountain Park Oklahoma she passed from this world on Saturday afternoon at her home in Laguna Hills California. Daniel Lee Laycock 50 Plainfield Indiana passed away Friday June 3 2011, I thought your readers might like to know about a $12 million gift made by the Crawford estate in support of the Crawford Auto and Aviation Collection at the Western Reserve Historical Society, Thought you might enjoy seeing this, The California racers reunion will be in October and run by the Riverside Automobile Museum, Thank you very much for getting back to me, Don Edwards is having a special book signing for his book Drag Boats of the 1960s; Photo Archive, Was just going through some of my books and discovered one that has been in my library for some time, Founded in 1944 the Sports Car Club of America Inc, Sonic Wind LSRV is a Land Speed Rocket Car attempting to break the Absolute Land Speed Record of 763 mph and trying to be the First Car to go 1000 MPH, hope you can access the YouTube video at the bottom of this message, I am having trouble meeting the 100 stories I said I could put up, It may have been raining ‘cats and dogs’ outside during finals day at the Main Event held at Santa Pod Raceway on May 30, I saw your website last night and I have a question about your business, Mickey Thompson; The Fast Life And Tragic Death Of A Racing Legend By Erik Arneson, Gone Racin' ...Karl and Veda Orr.  Story by Richard Parks with contributions by Bob Falcon Carole Sweikert Ron Ceridono, The following story comes from Bob Falcon with editorial comments in parenthesis from Carole Sweiker, UPCOMING MUSEUM BENEFIT AUCTION, The Charles Jarrott Commemoration Run (Sunday 5th June)

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

President's Corner:  
Jim Miller is on assignment in a far, far distant galaxy (England) and will return with lots of good stories.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Editorial:   
   The revised and re-edited version of the Karl and Veda Orr story is in this issue. The original story was written in 2008 with the knowledge that we had at the time and was mostly accurate. But we found out some new things that made the old story incorrect and did a disservice to two of the founding figures of land speed racing. Karl and Veda Orr were a very respected and influential couple and their story needs to be told with the greatest accuracy. I am glad that several sources came forward and helped me correct the slight imperfections and misunderstandings, because we want history to be reflected as accurately as possible. I want to give a special thank you to Carole Sweikert for providing new information on Karl and Veda Orr. She is the oldest daughter of Bob Sweikert, who won the Indy 500 in 1955 the year that Billy Vukovich died. She is also the god-daughter of Karl and Veda Orr. There are also many men and women who we have not got around to describing and telling you their stories. We only know what we have observed or what we have found out in doing research. If the documents, photographs and other data are not there, we are just as lost as you are. Sometimes it seems that we are only interested in the SCTA, but that is not true. The SCTA was extremely influential in the 1930’s and ‘40’s, but the reason that we focus on them is that they are still in existence and material on that organization is readily available. As records become available for other timing associations we will gladly report on them.
   Notice that we have a new book review by Dave Wallace Jr. There is a large selection of book reviews at www.hotrodhotline.com and www.landspeedracing.com. Book reviews are very valuable for several reasons. One, they describe a book, magazine or movie and tell the reader vital information. That allows the reader to decide whether they want to buy the book and add it to their library. Another reason that book reviews are valuable is that they let people know what is available; a sort of advertising. I am often unaware of a book’s existence until I see a book review and then I just have to have that book and will go to a book store and have them order it. If I didn’t see the review then I would never have known about the book’s existence; or about a magazine article or movie. A third reason that reviews are important has to do with decision making. Many people will simply ignore buying a book if they just hear about it once; but if they see reviews and hear that people are buying this book; then they may want it too. In other words, reviews are motivators. If one review is beneficial then two or three reviews are better. When I review a book I do it the way that interests me, but that doesn’t mean that I’m a great reviewer. I may overlook certain things and emphasize other things. I simply can’t be everything to everybody. If you would like to review a book and submit it to me then I will gladly publish it. 
   The response that I get when I ask people to write book, magazine or movie reviews is that, “I don’t know how,” or “people will laugh at my effort.” I have no formal training in editing, writing or crafting book reviews. Neither did my father when he became the editor of
Hot Rod magazine. It’s unfair to say that we are self-taught, because both of us are well-read and we did have a public education. But it is fair to say that we did learn on our own by doing. Some of the first issues of the newsletters and magazines that we worked on are rather amateurish, but we got better with practice. The same thing is true with reviews; you aren’t going to be perfect with your first one and you will get better as you do more of them. Some of the best reviews are rather rough around the edges. Tex Smith, who has edited more magazines than I care to remember, fills his columns with “sorta, coulda, kinda, shoulda, wanna” and many other “words of the hoi polloi.” You would think that he is a drop-out from the local junior high school, not the college educated, Air Force pilot that he once was. He writes the way he feels and the substance and importance of what he says is all that matters. You can learn more from Tex Smith in one paragraph that you can from some of the university academics with stilted, but professional writing skills. We don’t laugh at people. We go past “how” they write to the gist of what they are saying. The idea is always better than the grammar and style. So if you want to do a review, do it and send it to me.
   Another issue comes to mind. When you, as a writer, researcher or historian, borrow material, please follow the proper research guidelines. First, explain in detail to the person that is lending you their photos or memorabilia just how long you are going to need to use it. Don’t say that you’ll return it SOON. Soon to you might be a year and soon to the lender might be a week. Secondly, if you go past the deadline, call and explain and ask for an extension. Do not and I repeat, DO NOT simply keep the material and make the lender beg and plead with you to respond. Three, put in writing just exactly what you are borrowing and take a few photographs of what you are receiving. This way you can prove that you returned everything. Sometimes the lender believes that you have more than you borrowed, because he/she did not make an inventory of what they lent you. If you fail to make a list of what you have borrowed and the condition that it was in then I can guarantee you that sooner or later you will be accused of “stealing” objects and your reputation will be harmed. When your reputation is harmed, you harm the rest of us, because we are associated with you because of your ties to the SLSRH. If you are a bad or lazy borrower then you shouldn’t be called a professional (or even amateur) historian and you should not be writing. It takes skill and professionalism to do what we are doing and we want to have a high degree of honesty and integrity. Learn and practice the rules of borrowing artifacts and returning them in good condition on time. Jim Miller often makes copies and gives the originals and copies back to the lender. Go the extra mile for those who lend you materials to research.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Services for Bill Summers will be held on June 18, 2011 at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints starting around Noon; the Chapel is located on 522 West Francis Street, Ontario, California. Telephone number is (909) 983-9419.  A second memorial gathering is planned for June 24, 2011 at 5:30 pm at the Wally Parks NHRA Motorsports Museum, 1101 West McKinley Avenue, Pomona, California 91768-1639. Telephone number is (909) 622-2133.  Ken Freund

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I went to the memorial service for Mike Kitchen yesterday at the Corona Del Mar, California Senior center. He was a Donut Derelict guy. He had a 1932 and a ‘36 roadster. There were so many people there and the pictures of him were great. So sad he wasn't there for the party, he would have loved seeing everyone. Larry was so bummed when heard the news and was glad he stopped by the hangar on his way out to Palm Desert the Saturday before. He will be missed. Gerry McKinney (Larry's wife).

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Drake-Landers, Eve Louise  April 7, 1911 - May 28, 2011   Born Eva Louise Roark in Mountain Park, Oklahoma, she passed from this world on Saturday afternoon at her home in Laguna Hills, California.  Her father, Stanley Roark died in 1913. In 1917 mother Pearl married Hugh Thrasher and the family moved to Stillwater, and then to Neosho, Missouri to be near the Roark family after Hugh died in 1927. In Neosho Eve had the lead role in the senior play and graduated high school in 1929. She became known as the “Smile Girl of the Ozarks”; became a beauty contest winner, and represented the state in a national secretarial contest. She came to Los Angeles in 1930 to try her luck in the movies with the Hollywood Studio on Glendale Boulevard where she had a part in “Honor of the Press”. She met and married Dale Drake who had already won fame as a glider builder and pilot, making long-distance flights from Reedley to Southern California. His family had established the thriving JADSON machine shop in Bell--where they lived, and where their only child, John, was born. JADSON sponsored the race car of 1928 Indianapolis 500-winner Louie Meyer, and Dale became his crew chief and riding mechanic—winning at Indy two more times in 1933 and 1936. Eve joined them in the whirl and glamour of champ-car racing from the 1930s to the 1970s. She knew everybody in the racing community ... her beauty, lovely smile, bright wit and contagious enthusiasm brought her friends and admirers from all corners.  With Dale as chief mechanic and young son Johnny driving, she brought her organizing skills to their racing-boat crew.
     At around the same time, at the end of WWII, she was elected to leadership positions in several community and women’s groups, as well as heading up the power-boat squadron and starting their Ladies Auxiliary; while also being a volunteer supporter of the Boy Scouts. These pursuits brought her many friends and much-deserved recognition for her community spirit--while friends and family enjoyed her musical talents on organ and piano. Their beautiful ‘chalet’ at Lake Gregory was the scene of many family get-togethers. Their family visits to the Drake homestead ranch at Dunlap, east of Fresno, were filled with warm and loving chatter and music with Dale’s large family.  She played an important role in the formation of the 1946 partnership of Meyer & Drake to build the Offenhauser racing engines. In 1965 Dale, Eve and John took over the engine business and Eve became corporate secretary-treasurer.  They then went head to head with the giant Ford Motor Company then building their own V8 racing engines. After the Drakes took over, each won Indy six times and each won about 90 other champ car races, while other wins were being piled up in midget racing and sprint-car racing. When Dale died in 1972 she became even more closely involved, and five of their six Indy wins came in a row from 1972 to 1976, competing mainly with the Ford engine then being built (and driven) by her good friend AJ Foyt. They spoke on the phone not long before her 100th birthday and had a fine time reminiscing about their racing friends of the ‘old days’.  Her loving brother Rex sent these words, “She put on fashion shows and took a course on the subject and had exquisite taste in cosmetology and women's clothes. She and I went to luncheons at JW Robinson's to watch the fashion shows. She was a very versatile woman and had real "class" and was a shrewd business woman. Dale was the mechanical genius and Eve was the business woman that established the business - a great combination.”    
     She married long-time family friend Clyde Landers, M.D. in 1973. They enjoyed travelling and took several ocean cruises. Retiring to The Wellington Hotel for seniors in Laguna Hills they enjoyed the camaraderie and activities with other guests until Clyde died.  Then, daughter-in-law Beatrice Drake took on the duty to act as Eve’s eyes, protector and guardian--looking after her welfare as her sight failed and she began, in her 90s, to show signs of tiring.  Eve was pre-deceased by twin sister Edith (1961), husbands Dale Drake (1972), Clyde Landers (2000), niece Betty Jean Surber (2002) and son John (2004).   She leaves her faithful companion and loving care-giver for many years, Beatrice Drake (Ken Berg); brother Rex Thrasher, grand-daughters Jennifer (Doug Norris Drake) and Janet (Bob Carlile) and great-grand-sons Robert, John and Brett Carlile; and great-nieces Shirley Morris, and Debra Place; and great grand-daughter Lori Fleckner (Mark Vanecek) and many other grieving family members and friends.  Eve is one of the last of the pioneers of the glory days of American racing and her legacy tells us of her adventures as a California pioneer with a down-to-earth heart of gold and an outlook and spirit not easily found these days.  “We will miss your bright eyes and sweet smile.“  A private interment is planned.   Ken Berg

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Daniel Lee Laycock 50, Plainfield, Indiana, passed away Friday June 3, 2011. He was a devoted employee of the Coca Cola Bottling Co. for over 30 years, where he loved his work as a mechanic. Laycock was a member of the Moose Lodge and enjoyed bowling, golf, Texas Holdem Poker and all types of auto racing. He is survived by two sons, Daniel Ryan Laycock and Brandon Laycock; daughter, Candace Laycock; father, Robert M (Sandra) Laycock; sister, Debbie (Rich) Ludolph; two brothers, Josh (Michelle) Laycock and Rob (Sara) Laycock; sister-in-law, Maricela Laycock; special friend, Natalie Feeb; two grandchildren, Brayden and Maysen. He was preceded in death by his mother, Shirley Davis and brother, Jay Laycock. Danny was the son of Bob Laycock Jr, brother of Josh Laycock, former IMS media, and nephew of Dave Laycock, USAC and IRL chief mechanic. Grandfather Bob Laycock Sr was a historian and media for IMS before his death. Memorial services will be held at 6 p.m. Wednesday June 8, 2011 at Conkle Funeral Home Speedway Chapel, with visitation from 4 p.m. until the time of service. In lieu of flowers mail checks payable to Conkle Funeral Home in care of the family of Daniel Laycock. Online condolences may be shared at: conklefuneralhome.com.  Sent in by Betty Packard

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I thought your readers might like to know about a $12 million gift made by the Crawford estate in support of the Crawford Auto and Aviation Collection at the Western Reserve Historical Society. It is exciting that the Crawfords have chosen to support the care of the collection with an endowment of this size. Certainly the Historical Society had only a small endowment restricted to the collection prior to this gift. I have listed the link to the Plain Dealer story below. 
http://blog.cleveland.com/metro/2011/05/western_reserve_historical_soc_4.html. Thank you. Gregg Simpson, Cleveland Heights, Ohio
   Gregg: Michael Kacsala beat you to the punch with the article, which has been published on www.landspeedracing.com (issue #206). Along with a grant for $100,000,000 from Margie Petersen to the Petersen Automotive Museum, two fine museums and their collections now have vital funding to continue their operations. Museums are a vital archive for our history and heritage and play an important part in the cultural history of our nation. The current director faced daunting problems in overcoming the debt burdens and losses placed upon the museum by previous administrations when the national and local economies were booming. The recession has put unbelievable stress upon the cities and communities and their abilities to operate in the black. Hopefully the museum in Cleveland has seen the end of the exodus of capable staff, volunteers, artifacts and some of the auctioned Crawford cars in the collection and healing can begin again. Perhaps this is the time for the present administration to open their doors and welcome back the old staff and volunteers who were let go.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Thought you might enjoy seeing this. Quite a conversation ensued between Foyt and Force after their introduction. Two legends from different forms of Motorsports. Ed Justice Jr.
               ------------------------
See http://www.edjusticejr.com/index_news.html.   Ed Justice Jr. introduces John Force to Indy 500 legend A.J. Foyt on Friday May 27th, John Force came to the Indianapolis Motor Speedway for his first visit ever to the famed race track. He was joined by Tom Compton, President of the NHRA, and funny car drivers, Robert Hight, and Courtney Force. One of John's desires was to meet the legendary A.J. Foyt during his visit. Ed Justice Jr. was standing outside Foyt's garages while Force and his group were attempting an introduction. Ed being a longtime friend of both made it happen and brought John and the group into A.J.'s private area of the garage.
   Art Chrisman to be inducted into the SEMA Hall of Fame.  Art Chrisman who is the subject of the recently published book by EJJE Publishing Group, will be inducted into the SEMA Hall of Fame during the Installation Banquet & Gala Fundraiser, Friday, July 29, 2011. The other inductees are Gray Baskerville, Chris Economaki and John Towle. The limited edition book that covers the life of Art Chrisman and his family, THE CHRISMAN LEGACY, is available at www.chrismanlegacy.com
  
Motor Trend Classic; The Photography of Ed Justice, Jr. featured in MOTOR TREND CLASSIC magazine. The Spring 2011 issue of the beautiful MOTOR TREND CLASSIC magazine features some of the photography of Ed Justice, Jr in a feature article titled, SNAKE VERSUS MONGOOSE, Inside Drag Racing Greatest Rivalry. Make sure to check it out.
   Ed Justice, Jr. interviews Parnelli Jones at the 2011 Legends of Riverside.  The 3rd annual Legends of Riverside was celebrated at the Riverside International Automobile Museum. The event which is a multi-day celebration of Riverside Racetrack and automotive films is capped off with a gala dinner on Saturday night. Each year, one "Legend" is honored. This year’s honoree was Parnelli Jones. The two previous honorees were Dan Gurney and Carroll Shelby. This year as in the past Ed Justice, Jr. interviewed the honoree for almost a full hour, covering subjects not normally discussed.
   Ed Justice Jr. on Jay Leno's Garage.  On the heels of the successful introduction of
THE CHRISMAN LEGACY, Ed gets a chance to stop by Jay Leno's Garage and visit with Jay Leno about the book. Jay being a fan and lover of the early days when young men were coming back from the war and building Hot Rods, has a very informative and fun interview with Ed. 
   Art Chrisman honored at the NHRA Wally Parks Motorsports Museum.  A tribute was held at the NHRA Wally Parks Motorsports Museum to honor Art Chrisman and celebrate the donation of two of Art's cars to the museum from Mr. Bill Lindig of Houston, Texas. The two cars are the #25 car and the legendary Hustler I. Author of
THE CHRISMAN LEGACY, Tom Madigan attended along with the Publisher of the book, Ed Justice, Jr. 
   Midget Hall of Fame Ed Justice Jr. sponsors the Midget Hall of Fame plaque.  Noted racecar owner Steve Lewis, Ed Justice, Jr., President & CEO of Justice Brothers and racecar driver Jason Leffler presented Lesley Kendall, curator of the Petersen Automotive Museum a plaque recognizing members of the National Midget Hall of Fame. This all occurred during the 70th running of the Turkey Night Grand Prix midget race at Toyota Speedway at Irwindale.
   Ed Justice, Jr and Justice Brothers will publish a limited edition book by Tom Madigan on the Chrisman family. Art Chrisman was the first man to drive a dragster 140mph and 180mph. He also won the first Bakersfield March Meet. Uncle Jack Chrisman is credited with the first Nitro powered "Funny Car". He also was the first dragster winner of the NHRA Winternationals.  Website courtesy of Ed Justice Jr
     Ed: Thank you for the great link.  I am recommending your website for our readers at www.landspeedracing.com

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The California racers reunion will be in October and run by the Riverside Automobile Museum.  Wonderful place and lots of people to run it  I am very happy here in Texas and have renewed bonding times with all my family.  Hila Sweet
   Readers: We are hoping that Hila will come from her new home in Texas to attend the reunion that she started many years ago. Originally the reunion was called the Jalopy Racers Reunion, but so many of her friends (she calls them affectionately her “Peeps” for people) also raced in other forms of motorsports that she renamed the reunion to the California Racers Reunion. I copied her organizational format to form the Boat Racers Reunion in 2000. At her reunions she brought together open wheel, stock car, midget, jalopy, drag, land speed, road course and many other forms of car racing. Hila knows everybody and she was also a demon on the race course. She delighted in taking on anyone who would race her and she gave everyone she raced a run for their money. The California Racers Reunion is an event you will want to attend.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Thank you very much for getting back to me. I actually contacted Art Bagnall myself; I got his # from Dick Wallen. Art told me the same thing he told you, that they were scattered all around the country and that they (the family) didn't have any interest in that stuff. I believe he said that one of them was in Reno. These old photos are hard to find and especially VFW Speedway in Detroit, it was latter called Motor City Speedway. It got to be quite a famous place, Sam Hanks, Ronnie Householder, Perry Grimm and several others came from California and raced there. If you ever come across any other info, will you please contact me by email at [email protected].  Please put a request in your newsletter for me. Thanks again, Steve Wolski
   Readers: If any of you know of or have photographs of the VFW Speedway in Detroit (Motor City Speedway), please send an email to Steve and let him know. One of the purposes of the SLSRH Newsletter is to help researchers and historians find sources of information so that they can do stories and histories on racing.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Don Edwards is having a special book signing for his book Drag Boats of the 1960s; Photo Archive. The author is Bob Silva and photographs and captions are by Don Edwards and Barry McCown. The foreword is by Larry Schwabenland. All four of these men have been honored by the Boat Racers Reunion with their Honorary Award for outstanding performance in boat racing, manufacturing, writing and/or photography. The date is Saturday, July 9, 2011 from 11:00 am to 3:00 pm, at the Barnes & Noble Bookstore. The address is 6326 Pacific Coast Highway, Long Beach, California. There may also be many famous drag and other boat racing personalities and racers in attendance, so buy a book and get these men to autograph the photographs of their boats. Edwards and McCown have created a book that fills a much needed gap in the racing history of drag boat racing in the 1960’s; the Golden Age of boat racing. Bob Silva is an excellent writer and researching historian for boat racing magazines.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hello!   Was just going through some of my books, and discovered one that has been in my library for some time.  It is called" FLAT OUT, and was published by a company in Portland, Oregon in 1994. The author is Albert Drake.  It's packed with pictures of dry lakes cars from the '30s and '40s.  Are you folks familiar with this book?    Bud Lang
     Bud: I've heard of the book but have not reviewed it yet.  I have reviewed two of Albert Drake's books;
Hot Rodder and Portland Pictorial.  Drake has a zealous following among many hard core hot rodders.  He has an excellent way of interviewing people to bring out the very best from them.  If you would like to do a book review on Flat Out I would be delighted to publish it under your name at the Gone Racin' series located on www.hotrodhotline.com. 
         ---------------------------
I'll work on it this week, and see what I can come up with.  Naturally, you can edit the copy I send. Let me know if you prefer a certain style, or whatever.  Bud Lang
    
Bud: Book, magazine and movie reviews should be in a format that the writer of the review prefers.  There is no standardized version.  Every reviewer has their own style and I never try to change that style.  I try and leave articles and reviews alone unless I see something that would be embarrassing to the reviewer.  Some reviews are short and to the point.  Others, like the New York Times goes to absurd lengths to explain what is in a book, magazine or movie.  My feeling is that a review should give the basic structure of the magazine, movie or book; size, price, length, content, photographic quality, where to get the book and a general rating by the reviewer.  I also believe that more than one review is better.  Reviews tend to be judgmental and therefore having several reviews gives the public a better perspective as to whether to buy it or not.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Founded in 1944, the Sports Car Club of America, Inc. (SCCA) is a 60,000-member motorsports organization that incorporates all facets of autocross, rally and road racing at both club and professional levels. It annually sanctions over 2,000 events through its 114 regions and professional subsidiary. Landmark events and series for the Club include the SafeRacer SCCA National Racing Series; the Club Racing National Championship Runoffs® at Road America; and The Tire Rack® SCCA Solo National Championships and ProSolo Championship at Lincoln, Nebraska. SCCA is a proud official partner of BFGoodrich Tires, Black Magic, Gumout, Hawk Performance, Mobil 1, Pace American, Racing Radios, SafeRacer, Sunoco, The Tire Rack and Volkswagen. For more information, please visit www.scca.com.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sonic Wind LSRV is a Land Speed Rocket Car attempting to break the Absolute Land Speed Record of 763 mph and trying to be the First Car to go 1000 MPH!  We are happy to announce our New Website! It even works on Mobile Phones!  Sonic Wind LSRV first Email!  You have been added to this email list because you have either signed up through our website or have shown an interest in Land Speed Racing.  We would love for you to be a part of our journey.  Sonic Wind LSRV in the July 2011 edition of Smithsonian Air & Space.  Thanks to the help of Preston Lerner, Sonic Wind LSRV was featured in the July 2011 edition of Smithsonian Air & Space magazine on page 11.  We have added the full article for your reading pleasure on our website.  Land Speed Racing is not what it used to be. It used to be a small group of people from a local area who knew about your racing project. Now with the ability to connect with millions of racing fans through the internet we can create a world-wide following of our project. We have created a facebook page to offer news and information in quick form to those of you who are on Facebook regularly.  Sonic Wind LSRV, PO Box 720144 San Diego, California 92172.     Waldo Stakes

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I hope you can access the YouTube video at the bottom of this message. Thank God for the new miracle technology of on-board videotaping! What I am sending you here is one of the most interesting bits of video footage I ever saw in my life. It was made by my friend Rick Schnell of Anoka, Minnesota; of preliminary drag strip testing of his new blown fuel Flathead dragster engine. Rick has been building and racing this twenty years or so and he has just gotten his new engine out. Not yet fully "dialed in."  I have interviewed Rick twice for Bonneville Racing News, the last time a year ago when he did a test of his Flathead on a nearby shop's engine dyno and with 65% nitromethane fuel and 25 psi manifold pressure it recorded 939 horsepower for a few seconds. The engine is based on a production Ford Flathead V8 of the 1932-1953 side valve type which started life in '32 rated by Ford at 65 horsepower. The car has done a best official pass on the drag strip of 7.69 seconds and 174 mph. Thanks to the miracle of on-board videotaping, we can ride along with his son who is now doing the driving. See http://www.youtube.com/user/karschnell296#g/u.  William Hoddinott   

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I am having trouble meeting the 100 stories I said I could put up? I don’t like the idea of a few putting up most of the stories and hope to not have to resort to that one. Could you spare a few minutes to jot down a short story? Or if you can’t, please send me some idea and I will write one for you of course sending it back for your approval first. Thanks, aXe (Dennis Sylvia) See http://www.openwheelracers3.com/Indy_500_Fan_Articles.html.
  
Dennis: Mary Ann Lawford at www.hotrodhotline.com says that you can LINK to her site or if you want some of my bios you can request some.  Read over my articles at www.hotrodhotline.com, guest columnist, Richard Parks and tell me which ones you want and I will send them to you in a Word doc.  There's a mixture of stories and you can choose which ones appeal to your readers.  I may want to publish your link to your site to give you a bit of publicity and let the SLSRH readers know about you.  You may also extrapolate some of the land speed racing stories that you have on your website and send them to me at www.landspeedracing.com for me to cross publish in the SLSRH Newsletter.  When you do that I will give you full credit and a chance to publicize your site on the SLSRH.  You may write in as often as you wish.  The SLSRH Newsletter is free and dedicated to promoting sites like yours. 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

It may have been raining ‘cats and dogs’ outside during finals day at the Main Event held at Santa Pod Raceway on May 30th, but inside the Team West-Tec marquee it was raining twenty-pound notes as new Top Fuel dragster team F&A Racing handed over a second donation for the restoration of Europe’s first dragster. This time it was £500.00 and following on from their original £1000.00, it makes F&A Racing the largest individual financial supporter of the Allard Chrysler restoration project apart from insurance company Performance Direct.  Pictured (CLICK FOR IMAGE) standing in front of the team’s new car (now part of the Team West-Tec drag racing operation along with Andy Carter’s Lucas Oil Team West-Tec dragster), Chairman of the Allard Chrysler Action Group (ACAG), Brian Taylor, accepts the donation from F&A driver Chris Andrews.  Chris Andrews said, “We are really happy to support the ACAG team and their dedication to restoring Europe’s first dragster. And we pledge more funds in the future. The ACAG’s dedication and enthusiasm for this important task needs to be rewarded by all those involved in our sport. It is so rare to have the first of a kind in original condition and we are looking forward to the day when we can fire up our own car and Sydney Allard’s 1961 Allard Chrysler at the same event”.
   ACAG Chair Brian Taylor comments, “When I first prepared a list of potential supporters of our project I must admit that a Top Fuel Dragster team was not heading the names of those most likely to be interested. My thoughts were that they would have more than enough problems sorting out the financing of their own activities. The contact from F&A came out of the blue and to be honest, at first I didn’t believe it and thought it a bit of a wind-up. But I soon found out how serious they were. As well as seeing it as a good business proposal attractive to their own potential sponsors as part of an overall package, I think this support comes very much from the heart and we thank them sincerely. With projects like ours it sometimes gets quite depressing as far as raising funds – particularly in such a tough economic climate. Donations like this really give all of us a lift”.   If you would like to help complete the restoration of Europe’s first dragster contact Brian Taylor via [email protected]. You can also help by purchasing ACAG merchandise from www.allardchrysler.org.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hello, I saw your website last night, and I have a question about your business. Please call me at xxx-xxx-xxxx Thanks, James O'Kelley From Missouri. Unsubscribe me from this list .
   Readers: There is no James O’Kelley on my lists. You cannot get onto any of my newsletters unless you ask. To get off of the newsletters you simply click the unsubscribe button or you contact me and I know who you are and will do as you ask. All of my newsletters are free. As you can recognize, this is a spam email, but there is a point here. If you want to leave then all that you have to do is ask. I own no rope and handcuffs to bind you to anything that I edit. As for business, what part of FREE does the man NOT understand.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Mickey Thompson; The Fast Life And Tragic Death Of A Racing Legend, By Erik Arneson. Foreword by Danny Thompson. Review by Dave Wallace Jr. 78 photographs and two illustrations. 304 pages. Motorbooks. $17.99. 
   Author Erik Arneson could’ve chosen to fill all 300-plus pages by listing the hundreds of performance records that Mickey Thompson set between his teen years in hot rods and his early '50's in off-road vehicles—and the dozens of bones he broke in the pursuit of same. Properly explaining the man’s many mechanical inventions, from low-profile Indy-car tires to water-filled highway barriers, would’ve required hundreds more pages. Ditto for documenting promotional successes ranging from building California’s fabled Lions Drag Strip to transplanting off-road action from distant deserts into city stadiums. An entire volume could—and should—be devoted to the double-murder mystery that remains unsolved after 23 years. (The two hit men remain at large.) Thus is Arneson’s attempt to capture Thompson’s complicated, interwoven professional and personal lives bound to disappoint gearheads seeking a definitive history of the hot rodder who became world famous in 1960 as the fastest man on earth (406 m.p.h.) and again, tragically, in 1988. Though this softbound book includes enough technical details and race-car photos to keep a hardcore fan interested, its subtitle hints at the disproportionate pages devoted to the final moments of 59 incomparable years. (So, too, does its timing: The original hardcover appeared in 2008, one year after a former business partner was convicted of ordering the executions of Mickey and his second wife, Trudy.) Someday, some bigger book will fill in those blanks. Until then, fans of “M/T” should be grateful for the personal memories of friends and surviving family members that Arneson gathered and shared in this one. 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Gone Racin' ...Karl and Veda Orr.  Story by Richard Parks with contributions by Bob Falcon, Carole Sweikert, Ron Ceridono, Tom Medley, Wally Parks and others.  Photographic consultant Roger Rohrdanz. This story is an updated version with new and corrected material from an older version first published in 2008.
   Karl Orr was born in Kingston, Caldwell County, Missouri on February 9, 1906.  He died on January 15, 1992 in Los Angeles, California. The day that he died he kept talking about how tomorrow would be Veda's birthday, which was on January 16.   Karl began building racing cars as early as 1921 in his shop in Missouri.  He came to California in the 1920's and raced in land speed time trials as early as 1929 at Muroc, in his Model A. Karl raced a 4-cylinder modified and recorded a speed of 125 mph, which was supposedly the first to attain that speed on the Southern California dry lakes. He recorded times of 120 mph in his '32 Ford roadster. Karl was a flinty old codger at best, but he attracted a following of loyal fans and friends. He was talented and dedicated to his goals and not a person to trifle with. His views were seriously considered and he contributed to dry lakes racing in ways that gave respect to the early timing associations and to their successor, the Southern California Timing Association (SCTA).
   Karl was one of the older statesmen, even older than Wally Parks, Ed Adams, Art Tilton and the early leaders of the SCTA. If his views were not accepted by the SCTA, Karl often went his own way. He raced at Muroc long after the SCTA felt the criticisms of the public due to the outbreak of World War II. The main body of the governing board for the SCTA held the view that continued racing was not in their best interest. The war had brought shortages of every basic commodity and auto racing in general had been shut down in order to save on rubber, gasoline and other materials that the military needed badly. Karl didn't see any reason why the desperate world situation should inconvenience him in his quest for more speed and throughout the war, Karl found places to race.  (He wasn't drafted, nor did he volunteer.  Karl and his brothers had very flat feet.  He also had a very personal birth defect and he took a lot of criticism for not serving in the war, but his stubborn pride kept him from telling anyone about it.)        
   An article in the SCTA Times, written by Wally Parks, just after the war was over, complementary in nature towards him, sent him into a frenzy and he marched down to the SCTA offices with several of his followers to get satisfaction or else. Other than a great deal of shouting, cooler heads prevailed and Karl left without any broken furniture. He had taken offense to the words, "Karl Orr, sire of the record setting car."  (Karl wanted kids of his own and the word 'sire' probably hit him the wrong way due to his birth defect that made him sterile.) As difficult as he was to deal with, Karl Orr was also an important fixture in the Southern California racing scene, as a car builder, mechanic and owner of one of Southern California's pre-eminent new Speed Shops. He was an important member in the SCTA, but one who was given a lot more leeway than was allowed to others. One favor that he extracted that bordered on sheer heresy was letting his wife race at Muroc in the late 1930's, under the Muroc Timing Association's banner. The SCTA seriously frowned on women racing or even belonging to their group.
   The MTA was under the auspices of George Wight, owner of Bell Auto Parts and George Riley, who manufactured the Riley 4-Port among other speed equipment. There were other men who donated timing equipment and a delivery van that doubled as an ambulance, but the ownership of the MTA was held by a few older men. Karl was more their age and when he closed the cloth tarp on his roadster and told his young wife, Veda, to take off as soon as her name was called, no one contested Karl's decision or authority. It was a power and authority based on sheer will and crankiness. You challenged Karl Orr at your own peril. Right or wrong, Karl was a presence in land speed racing and he always earned a grudging respect from his peers, though he made their jobs much more difficult.   
   Veda married Karl Orr in 1936 and fell in love with the whole aspect of land speed racing and automobiles. In a way she went past the tutelage of her husband and became beloved by all the land speeders of that early generation. She was kind, compassionate and caring, but when Karl was attacked, she forgot what the controversy was about and rallied to his side. She raced with the Russetta Timing Association and after the war; the SCTA passed a special resolution giving Veda the full rights of membership and the ability to race at their meets. She set a record of 104.40 mph in the full fendered roadster class and then improved on the record by going 114.27 in 1937 at Muroc. Nellie Taylor and Don Blair let her drive their modified car and she turned 131mph, in an SCTA meet. She raced to a speed of 121.62 mph in a C Roadster category in 1947. Those were exceptionally fast times in those days with the type of cars that they had. The timing associations had policies about excluding women from their racing activities. They weren't exactly anti-women, though they weren't supporting women's rights either. The men simply felt that women couldn't do what the men could and that it would put people's lives at risk to let women drive. A bigger issue was the public perception of land speed racing and hot rodding.
   The public saw hot rodders and street racers as dangerous, out of control punks that felt no remorse as they put the public's safety at risk by their irresponsible behavior. By today's standards, those hot rodders were tame, but they often straddled the line between creative car builders and street-wise criminals. The timing associations, especially the SCTA, wished to present a picture to the public of a safe and sanctioned race, where speed and mechanical know-how and ability were the key elements. If someone crashed at a dry lakes meet and was injured or killed, the bad publicity would make it that much harder for them to convince the public of their good intentions and wise planning. If a woman was injured or killed at the dry lakes, the publicity might have ended any hope of acceptance by the public. State laws were being passed to outlaw the sport of hot rodding and land speed racing. The Dills Bills came very close to passage and they would have outlawed any car that was not stock. That the timing associations gave an exception to Veda Orr meant that she had gone beyond what was required to prove her driving skill and that she had gained the love and respect of the racers themselves.
   In fact, that's exactly what she did. As WWII began, a huge number of hot rodders were drafted or volunteered to go into the military and the SCTA lost so many members that within months of the outbreak of war, they voted to disband for the duration. All except Karl, who stubbornly went out to the desert and kept racing, bringing as many rebels as he could with him, until the military chased them out for good in 1942. There are reports that Karl continued to race wherever he found a flat surface to do so, while the SCTA board bit their tongues and resisted any discipline against him. Veda immediately took over the function of the old SCTA Times and began to send out newsletters, laboriously typed on mimeograph paper and reproduced, over and over again, until the paper gave out and she had to start over again. Finding valuable supplies not requisitioned by the war department, she collected news about the homeland and from the hot rodders overseas and put it all in her paper and then sent it back out to news hungry GIs and sailors. The SCTA Times had begun as a newsletter for land speed racing in Southern California by Wally Parks, Bozzy Willis and Eldon Snapp. Harry Cameron was the supposed editor, but they only used his name to deflect any criticism that might come their way. Veda loved what she was doing and her newsletter reached over 750 men overseas, who had just recently been SCTA members. They shared the newsletters with other service men and the land speed sport became well known. She never charged for her publication and she carried on correspondence with many lonely men serving in the military during the war.
   Before the war, the land speed movement had been localized to Southern California and there were few ways to inform young men in other parts of the country. In 1941, Jack Peters published
Throttle magazine and it did quite well, but after twelve issues, it was closed down and Peters went into the service. No one knows what happened to Peters after the war ended, but Throttle magazine only existed for that one year prior to the war. It gave a great deal of coverage to land speed racing, but was also concerned with oval track racing as well. Veda's newsletters and later her Dry Lakes Pictorial book, was the first real attempt at spreading the gospel of dry lakes land speed racing.  In 1966 Karl and Veda had lunch at Sambo's with Jack E. Jerrils, who had used the alias Jack Peters before the war.  They had both previously written about the dry lakes racing days.  They talked about the end of the war and old friends.  In 1974, at the Orr's home they had talked about Jerrils needing income after being discharged from the military and how he could not risk his job by writing elsewhere.  That was the reason that Jack E. Jerrils, alias Jack Peters never reestablished Throttle magazine after the war and left an opening for Robert E. 'Bob' Petersen to get a toehold into the publishing business with Hot Rod magazine.  Hot Rod looked very family in style and writing to Jerrils' pre-war Throttle magazine.  Jack's railroad and newspaper positions had kept him contented.  He wrote a book about the City of Carson, California, where he lived and that inspired him to want to write a book about the dry lakes with Veda.  Jerrils health deteriorated before they could do that and lung cancer ended their collaborations.  Veda prized his Throttle magazine set that he gave her.  Jack's death was inscribed in Veda's special ledger for lost allies in 1980.
   After the war came a series of B rated movies about young men and women gone bad and racing and wrecking lives on the streets and roads of America. So desperate were young men and women in the military for news at home that Veda's newsletters, photographs and pictorials were passed around to everyone. The number of copies per issue probably never exceeded 750, yet for the first time, land speed racing became known by hundreds of thousands and many of these young men came home with the hot rodding bug. After the war ended, Karl and Veda rebuilt the Speed Shop and as a team, they went racing at the dry lakes and in oval track racing, in midgets, track roadsters, sprint cars and any other motorsports that struck their fancy. Veda was born on January 16, 1910 and passed away on December 13, 1989.  Two years later Karl passed away in 1992, and they never had any children, though they were very close to a number of people, including Bob Sweikert's oldest daughter, who was Veda’s Goddaughter.  Karl was remembered as an early pioneer, but Veda was never forgotten by the men she gave hope to during the war years. The SCTA gave her a written commendation, thanking her for the service she had provided. The Veda and Karl Orr '32 Roadster was chosen as one of the top 75 Deuce Fords by the Ford Motor Car Company, when they celebrated the 75th Anniversary of the famous Roadster in 2007, at the Grand National Roadster Show, in Pomona, California.
   The following excerpts come from Wally Parks and Tom Medley. "I first met Veda in the 1930's, when she raced her 1932 roadster at Muroc Dry Lake. She was later active as the first female driver in SCTA's time trials history, at a time when women were not allowed to become members of the association. Veda was a behind-the-scenes partner with her husband Karl, who operated one of the first speed shops of prominence in California. She was accepted primarily because of her dedication and her expertise as a capable driver in what was still an experimental stage of the desert's lakebed speed trials. Karl was an outspoken, but genuinely dedicated member of that era's hot rod culture, who backed up his opinions, good and bad, with building and driving his own race cars. He was an early member of the 90 MPH Club, who later switched to the Road Runners. Until the World War II years, Veda was a dry lakes speed trials contestant, and then to cover more than just SCTA's activities she introduced her own
CT (California Timing) News publication and a CT News pictorial featuring popular race cars of that period. After the start of WWII, when SCTA's activities were put on hold, Veda extended her CT News to a special-interest mailer sent to military servicemen and defense industry hot rod members gratis-at least to ones she could locate. It was a blessing for overseas contacts. Veda was a door opener for the interest and participation of women in dry lakes racing. She was a role model in vehicle know-how and high-speed experience behind the wheel. Her record 122 mph in her '32 roadster was a mark for the guys to shoot at, which they did. After they sold their speed shop and discontinued their racing careers, Karl and Veda retired to Mint Canyon, north of Los Angeles on the road to the dry lakes, where they bought the local water works and discontinued their active roles as speed trials pioneers," Parks concluded.
   Tom Medley spoke of Veda, "(She) was the glue that held hot rodding together during the war years," said Tom. Tom "Stroker McGurk" Medley remembers meeting Veda on the dry lakes before World War II, where she was, in his words, "a hell of a competitor." Medley served in the European Theater of Operations (ETO) and was in the Battle of the Bulge, a vicious and deadly German counter-attack, where Ak Miller and Nellie Taylor were seriously wounded. "Even with everything that was going on around us, lots of us were thinking and talking about our hot rods back home, and Veda certainly helped out in that regard," said Tom. "Veda corresponded personally with lots of the guys overseas; she kept everyone posted on who was where and how they were doing. Veda Orr was the glue that held hot rodding together during the war years," Medley added. Tom sent one of his cartoons to Veda to be used in her newsletter and book. "When I got home after the war, I told Veda that we should start a magazine, but she said no because the speed shop was getting so busy," Medley continued. Tom and Veda often wondered about what would have happened if they had formed their own magazine. Would
Hot Rod magazine have ever got off the ground, they mused.
Gone Racin' is at
[email protected].   (Part of this story comes from an article by Ron Ceridono, and the recollections of Tom Medley, Wally Parks and Carole Sweikert.)

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The following story comes from Bob Falcon with editorial comments in parenthesis from Carole Sweikert.
            -------------------

Thought you'd like to know about this discovery. While reorganizing my personal library I uncovered an old dry lakes publication, Veda Orr's Lakes Pictorial-1946 Season.  (Veda produced several different years of the Pictorials.)  I recall, when as a teen, I would visit Karl's Culver City Speed Shop and Veda would be at a desk, organizing snapshots and banging-out copy on an old upright typewriter. In fact I knew the Orr's pretty well, in those days since their home was just a few blocks from my parents, in Culver City.  I do remember their house was on a street about three blocks from where my folks lived. As I recall it was just south of Braddock and across the street from (and around the corner from) a small park. The location was south of MGM Studios Main Lot. Their favorite color combination was white and black; hence, their house was painted white with black trim. The Orr's were real hot rodders! Their "family car" was a 1932 Ford Roadster with full fenders and a canvas top. Veda used to run this car at the lakes meets.
   I had visited there many times and recall Karl had ashtrays in his garage, a policy I adopted and continued until I gave up the habit many years ago. As far as I recall, Veda was a housewife who also helped at the speed shop. She handled the books and did some counter work when Karl was running errands. Of course, she did the assembly on her lakes books at the shop. One of their customers, who had a really neat 1932 Roadster, was a former Doolittle Raider. This flier was a frequent visitor to the speed shop. He lived in Venice, California and he was a paraplegic who received his injuries when he bailed out of, or crashed, his B-25 bomber in China. (Captain Ted W. Lawson was the pilot whose leg was amputated after his B-25 crashed in China.  Ted piloted the Ruptured Duck that took off from the USS Hornet on April 18, 1942.  The book was written in 1943.  The movie was released on November 15, 1944.  Actor Van Johnson portrayed Ted in the movie.) 
   I can't recall his name, but I know that Van Johnson played his character in the famous WW2 movie, "
Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo.”  Karl had closed the speed shop in the mid to late 1950's and went to work for Douglas Aircraft in Santa Monica. He was a regular visitor to my dad's shop. I recall that I was working the Swing Shift at AiResearch and building my 1932 coupe Jalopy racer in my dad's shop. Karl would stop by and check out my work, give me a few tips and go to the beer bar on the corner for lunch. One day he took a very long lunch and was headed back to the "Bird Farm" and declared he was going to tell them to shove it! He then disappeared off the radar. A few years later I was in Bouquet Canyon and spied a sign that read "Karl Orr Speed Shop" and we had a reunion.  (The Orr's took in two young women during their marriage.  One was a relative of Karl's who wanted a change in life.  She sometimes helped the Orr's at the shop to contribute to her upkeep.  The second was a pregnant lady from out of the area, whose fiancée had died while racing.  She promised to let the Orr's adopt her baby, but later changed her mind.  She also helped out at the Orr's shop and maybe this explains why people believed that the Orr's have broken up and divorced and that Karl had remarried.  Seeing these young ladies might have given the wrong impression to some people and the rumors spread that the Orr's had divorced and that Karl had remarried.  The Orr's remained married and lived together until they Veda passed away in 1989 and Karl in 1992). 
   I remember that Karl still stocked Crème Soda in his soft drink machine. Several years later I was told, by Jim Bremner, I believe that Karl and Veda had remarried and they were living in the San Diego area (this was another rumor that was believed but did not happen).  I think I had learned later that they both had "crossed the finish-line." I always liked them; they were really kind to me. Bouquet Canyon was a settlement kind of northeast of Saugus, in the desert. I was up there to do some target shooting with a friend and one or two of my kids. I wanted to test fire a .22 Beretta I had just purchased for $25. My friend had his Colt Army .45. We were driving through town when I spotted the speed shop sign. That was the only time I had ever seen the new Mrs. Orr, (Karl was still married to Veda and they never separated or divorced, so this lady might have been an employee or one of the women that Karl and Veda had taken in to live with them. Also, Karl was not able to have any children due to a medical condition. - Carole Sweikert) but recall her as being a very attractive blonde.   I don't recall whether they had any children and I would reckon that Karl was 50 or better at this time. I think Jim Bremner picked-up the later news from Frank Oddo. Both Jim and Frank are on the mailing list for the LSR newsletter. When I was helping John Kelly, and later Sandy Belond, build their Track Roadsters, Karl was a frequent visitor to the shop in the evenings. John Kelly and Sandy Belond were very good friends and both appreciated my efforts on their race car, even though I was just a kid in their eyes. I lost track of John but remained in touch with Sandy and his wife, Ruth, until their demise. I am still in contact with their daughter and her sons.
   I first met Ray Nichels through Sandy when Ray was working as the Chief Mechanic on Sandy's Indy Roadster. I maintained contact with Ray and his buddies Paul Russo and Johnny Pawl until they all "crossed the finish line." Later Karl built a "Big Car," which we now call Sprint Cars, and I think it was a conversion of his old lakes modified. He named the Sprinter “The K. O. Special.” He raced it with the old Western Racing Association (WRA) that served as the Big Car organization for SoCal. I've seen a picture of the car recently, but can't recall the publication that ran the photograph. I doubt if any of your present day WRA contacts can shed any light on the doings of the old WRA that was in operation for a short time right after WW2. If Joe Gemsa, Vince Conze or the Famaghetti brothers were still alive they could probably help. I think Karl had Bob Sweikert driving for him at one time. (Bob Sweikert drove off and on for Karl Orr between 1948 and 1952 and sometimes at the dry lakes for Karl.)  Dan Fleischer may be able to help since he is a good historian. Most of the present WRA guys think 1965 is ancient history!     Bob Falcon

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

image001


UPCOMING MUSEUM BENEFIT AUCTION:

JUNE 18, 2011, AT THE $40,000-TO-WIN 40TH ANNUAL JIM RAPER MEMORIAL DIRT CUP, SKAGIT SPEEDWAY, ALGER, WA

image002


image003

Auction Items include:

1. 1940 Ford Coupe
2. Donny Schatz 2007 Parker Stores 1/18 Autographed
3. Dirt Trackin' Springfield Style--Print--Framed and Matted
4. Jim Hurtubise Sterling Plumbing 1/18 Dirt Champ Car
5. Ladies Red Bull Pullover Jacket
6. Tony Pedregon Funny Car--Autographed
7. Bobby Unser 1/18 Key Special #3 Sprint Car-Autographed
8. 1958 Corvette Diecast
9. Primus Motorsports Jacket
10. Kasey Kahne Great Clips #38--Autographed
11. Kasey Kahne #9 Midget Photo--Framed and Matted
12. 1957 Sam Hanks Indy Glasses (2)
13. Ryan Newman #12 Alltel--Autographed
14. NST Zippered Hoodie
15. Dale Earnhardt Jr. Train Set
16. Johnny Rutherford/Jim McElreath 1966 Trenton Racing PhotoFramed, Matted and Autographed by Johnny Rutherford and Jim McElreath
17. NST T-Shirt and Hat
18. Sammy Swindell Channel Lock #38 Nascar Truck--Autographed
19. 1909 Thomas Flyer Decanter
20. Book--Let 'Em All Go--Autographed by Chris Economaki and Dave Argabright
21. Steve Kinser #26 Nascar--Autographed
22. 1979 Knoxville Nationals Beer Can
23. Kasey Kahne Speed Racer--Autographed
24. AJ Foyt 1/12 Sheraton Thompson Offy Dirt Champ
25. AJ Foyt Autographed Polo
26. Racing Quilt
27. 1937 Studebaker Pickup
28. Brad Furr Sanmina #2 Special Paint--Autographed
29. 1969 Bobby Unser Indy Glasses (12)
30. Travis Rutz Picture--Framed
31. 1995 Knoxville Jacket
32. Steve Kinser 1/18 Members Only Vise Grip Sprint--Autographed by Bob Trostle and Steve Kinser
33. Steve Kinser First Edition 1/18 GMP Sprint Car--Autographed
34. Book--Lone Wolf--Autographed by Doug Wolfgang and Dave Argabright
35. Robby Wolfgang--360 Nationals Photo--Framed-- Autographed
36. NST T-Shirt and Hat
37. Bobby Allen 1/18 Shark Sprint Car 1A--Autographed
38. Sammy Swindell Ore-Cal Sprint Photo--Framed and Matted--Autographed
39. Sammy Swindell Hood Snorkel--Autographed
40. Wooden Sprint car
41. Speedway Motors Catalog--Sammy and Kevin Swindell on Cover--Autographed by Sammy and Kevin
42. The Twin Chevys Racing Photo--Framed and Matted--Autographed by Parnelli Jones
43. 1960 Indy Winner Jim Rathman Carousel Diecast
44. Indy Racing Lights--Hornish Brothers Racing shirt
45. Rich Vogler #1 1/18
46. Danny Smith T-Shirt
47. Al Unser Racing Photo--Framed and Matted--Autographed
48. Tony Stewart #14 Old Spice Nascar--Autographed
49. Bud Kaeding T-Shirt
50. Ron Shuman Ofixco #21 1/18 Sprint--Autographed
51. Brent Keading Pioneer Concrete 1/18 Sprint--Autographed

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Charles Jarrott Commemoration Run (Sunday 5th June)

Charles Jarrot on Trike watercolour sketch POST

Charles Jarrott on a De Dion Bouton Tricycle
Watercolour on Bristol Board

Charles Jarrot Run (DDB Club) 5th June 2011 sketch POST

Quick ink sketch of the front end of a De Dion Bouton in Richmond Park

On the 29th November 1897 the first race meeting for motors in Great Britain Britain took place at Sheen House Richmond Park, London. Charles Jarrott organised the event which took place on the cycle track at Sheen House.


To celebrate such a momentous occasion the De Dion Bouton Club UK retraced the route that the Motor-Car Club took on that day starting off at Whitehall Place and driving to Sheen House.


It was the first time this event has been run and it was a fantastic sight to see so many De Dion Bouton cars and tricycles, being flagged off from Whitehall Place and running through London to Richmond Park. The Club then ran their cars and tricycles round the park, before heading off to Brooklands.

Pedal Start of a De Dion Bouton tricycle

Charles Jarrot Run 005

Charles Jarrot Run 025

Charles Jarrot Run 021

Charles Jarrot Run 018

Charles Jarrot Run 009

De Dion Bouton Club Members Dressed for the occasion.

Charles Jarrot Run 029

Charles Jarrot Run 035

Large single cylinder De Dion Bouton engine

Charles Jarrot Run 028

1897 De Deon Bouton tricycle engine

For more information on the De Dion Bouton Club UK please visit their website where you can read more on the history and the clubs activities.


http://www.dedionboutonclub.co.uk


The clubs bulletin "De Dion Bouton Motorvations" is a fantastic read, as it not only documents the clubs activities it contains articles on the history of the marque.


Many thanks to Nick Pellett who organised the The Charles Jarrott Commemoration Run, making it such a success.

line12

 

 

 

line12

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Land Speed Racing Websites:
www.hotrodhotline.com, www.landspeedracing.com

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Members:

Jonathan Amo, Brett Arena, Henry Astor, Gale Banks, Glen Barrett, Mike Bastian, Lee Blaisdell, Jim Bremner, Warren Bullis, Burly Burlile, George Callaway, Gary Carmichael, John Backus, John Chambard, Jerry Cornelison, G. Thatcher Darwin, Jack Dolan, Ugo Fadini, Bob Falcon, Rich Fox, Glenn Freudenberger, Don Garlits, Bruce Geisler, Stan Goldstein, Andy Granatelli, Walt James, Wendy Jeffries, Ken Kelley, Mike Kelly, Bret Kepner, Kay Kimes, Jim Lattin, Mary Ann and Jack Lawford, Fred Lobello, Eric Loe, Dick Martin, Ron Martinez, Tom McIntyre, Don McMeekin, Bob McMillian, Tom Medley, Jim Miller, Don Montgomery, Bob Morton, Mark Morton, Paula Murphy, Landspeed Louise Ann Noeth, Frank Oddo, David Parks, Richard Parks, Wally Parks (in memoriam), Eric Rickman, Willard Ritchie, Roger Rohrdanz, Evelyn Roth, Ed Safarik, Frank Salzberg, Dave Seely, Charles Shaffer, Mike Stanton, David Steele, Doug Stokes, Bob Storck, Zach Suhr, Maggie Summers, Gary Svoboda, Pat Swanson, Al Teague, JD Tone, Jim Travis, Randy Travis, Jack Underwood and Tina Van Curen, Richard Venza.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[HRHL Home] [2011 Show Coverage] [Classifieds] [Press Releases]
[Advertising Information] [Buyers Guide] [Vendor Directory]
 [Barn & Field Cars] [Biker Hotline] [Blast to the Past] [Book Reviews]
[Build Articles] [Club Directory] [Event Listings] [From our Friends]
[Garage Shots] [Guest Columnists] [Hotrod MD] [Landspeed Racing]
[Modern Rods] [New Products] [Newsletter Archive] [Order a Catalog]
[Our Heroes] [Rodders Forum] [Rodders Row] [Shop Tours] [Site Map]
[Stolen] [Tech] [Vanity Plates] [Young Rodders] [EMAIL]

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Copyright 1999 - 2011 Hot Rod Hot Line All Rights Reserved
No Portion May Be Used Without Our Written Permission
Contact Us Toll Free (877) 700-2468 or (208) 562-0470
230 S. Cole Rd, Boise, ID 83709